Two prominent nonprofit journal publishers embrace an alternative route to open access

Open access is a major trend in journal publishing, but the cost of publishing has not disappeared. The existing open access model is mainly to transfer the cost from the university library to the author of the paper. Universities worry that they may pay more to help scientists publish their papers than subscriptions to journals. Now two prominent nonprofit journal publishers have tried different ways to support open access.

Two prominent nonprofit journal publishers embrace an alternative route to open access

Annual Reviews announced the Subscribe to Open solution, changing the nature of the subscription, which means that the subscription fee for the institution remains the same (with a 5% discount), but the journal becomes open to access. ACM, the American Computer Association, requires that the institutions that publish the most papers in their journals pay more, and that researchers at these institutions will be able to publish papers in ACM journals without restriction, eliminating the need to pay for the processing of papers. ACM hopes the program will maintain journal revenue and will open access to 21,000 peer-reviewed papers published annually. So far, both options have received a positive response.