New study: People who worked during the outbreak were happier and healthier than those who didn’t

In a recent study published on the pre-printed website medRxiv, researchers surveyed 369 young people in 64 cities with different severity of the outbreak from February 20 to 21. The survey included their health, depression, and life satisfaction over the past week. Participants also reported their work status, whether they had a chronic illness, and how much time they exercised each day.

New study: People who worked during the outbreak were happier and healthier than those who didn't

The results showed that 26.8 per cent of people worked in the office during the outbreak, 37.7 per cent from home, 25.2 per cent stopped working, 8.7 per cent did not work before the outbreak began and 1.6 per cent lost their jobs during the outbreak.

People who work in the office have better mental and physical health than those who stop working. People who work from home also have better mental health than those who stop working.

People who stop working have more serious personal limitation and emotional problems than those who work in the office. The difference between working from home and working in an office is small. People who work in the office suffer less depression and are more satisfied with their lives than those who stop working.

People who were accustomed to exercising more than 2.5 hours a day had lower life satisfaction; life satisfaction for 1-2.5 hours a day was not related to the severity of the outbreak; and life satisfaction was higher for those who exercised for less than 30 minutes a day.