WHO: China’s first vaccine trial has begun to be incredible

“As you know, 60 days after the virus gene sequence was shared in China, the first vaccine trial has begun. This is an incredible achievement. “World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tan Desai 18 at the WHO’s regular press conference on new coronary pneumonia said. According to the WHO official website, Tandese said in a speech on the 18th that WHO has received more than 200,000 new cases of coronary pneumonia, more than 8,000 people have died. More than 80 per cent of cases come from the western Pacific and Europe.

WHO: China's first vaccine trial has begun to be incredible

“We know that many countries are now facing a growing epidemic and feel unable to help. Tandesser expressed his understanding of the current situation in many countries and said that different countries and communities are in different situations and spread to different degrees.

However, Mr Tandessaid said WHO was helping countries prepare and prioritize on a case-by-case basis.

“Don’t assume your community won’t be affected. Be prepared as if you were going to be affected. Don’t assume that you won’t be infected. Be prepared as if you’re going to be infected. Tandeser cautioned.

Tandeser then described specific measures to control the outbreak in a number of countries and called on all countries to adopt a comprehensive approach to slow the spread and smooth the curve. Comprehensive measures can save lives and buy time for the development of vaccines and therapies.

Among them, Tandeser also talked about vaccine trials in China. “As you know, 60 days after the virus gene sequence was shared in China, the first vaccine trial has begun. This is an incredible achievement. “

Finally, Tandesser expressed his determination and confidence to overcome the outbreak. He says the virus poses an unprecedented threat. But it is also an unprecedented opportunity for us to work together against this common enemy, an enemy that is endangering humanity.

The following is a statement by WHO Director-General Tan Desai at the media briefing on the new coronavirus outbreak on 18 March:

Good afternoon.

More than a month has passed since the last case of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. If this continues, the outbreak will be declared over in less than a month.

We would like to thank all our partners for their unity and dedication to the work of the Congolese people. I would also like to pay special tribute to the Government and people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo

We must build on the same spirit of solidarity and defeat COVID-19.

WHO has received more than 200,000 coVID-19 cases, resulting in more than 8,000 deaths.

More than 80 per cent of cases come from the western Pacific and Europe.

We know that many countries are now facing a growing epidemic and feel unable to do so.

We have heard your voices and know that you are facing great difficulties and bear a great burden. We understand the difficult choices you have to make.

We know that different countries and communities are in different situations and spread to varying degrees.

WHO talks daily with health ministers, heads of state, health workers, hospital managers, industry leaders, CEOs, etc. to help them prepare and prioritize on a case-by-case basis.

Don’t assume that your community won’t be affected. Be prepared as if you were going to be affected.

Don’t assume that you won’t be infected. Be prepared as if you’re going to be infected.

There is still hope. All countries have a lot to do.

Social isolation measures, such as the cancellation of sporting events, concerts and other large gatherings, help slow the spread of the virus.

They can reduce the burden on health systems.

They help to control outbreaks and take targeted and focused measures.

However, in order to contain and control the epidemic, countries must isolate, detect, treat and track.

If this is not done, the chain of transmission will still exist, the spread of the virus may remain at a low level, and once the social distance measures are lifted, it will spread rapidly.

WHO continues to recommend that the isolation, detection and handling of each suspected case and the tracking of each contact must be a pillar of each country’s response. This is the best way to prevent the spread of the wider community.

This can be done in most countries with sporadic cases or clusters of cases.

Many countries have listened to us and are seeking to improve their capacity to implement a full set of measures. Some countries have reversed the situation by taking these measures.

But we know that some countries are experiencing severe outbreaks of large-scale community transmission.

We understand the effort required to suppress transmission in such situations. But it can be done.

A month ago, the Republic of Korea faced the problem of accelerated community communication, but it did not surrender.

The Korean Government educates the community, empowers the community and encourages community participation;

It develops innovative detection strategies and expands the capabilities of laboratories;

It has introduced a rationing of masks;

It has carried out detailed contact tracing and detection in specific areas;

It isolates suspected cases in designated institutions rather than in hospitals or homes.

As a result, cases have been declining for weeks. At its peak, there were more than 800 new cases a day, compared with 90 reported today.

WHO is working closely with other countries where community communication occurs, drawing lessons from South Korea and other countries to respond according to local conditions.

WHO continues to recommend that, where possible, confirmed cases of mild illness be isolated in medical facilities and that good medical care be provided to them by trained medical personnel in order to prevent clinical deterioration and secondary transmission.

If this is not possible, states can use community facilities to isolate and care for cases of mild illness and, if necessary, quickly refer them to specialized medical facilities.

If medical facilities are at risk of overburdening, patients with light care can be cared for at home.

This is not ideal. WHO provides advice on its website on how to provide home care as safely as possible.

WHO continues to call on all countries to adopt a comprehensive approach to slow ingress and flatten the curve.

Comprehensive measures can save lives and buy time for the development of vaccines and therapies.

As you know, 60 days after the virus gene sequence was shared in China, the first vaccine trial has begun. This is an incredible achievement.

We commend researchers around the world for working on systematic evaluation of experimental therapies.

But multiple small-scale trials using different methods may not provide us with the clear and strong evidence we need to prove which treatments can help save lives.

As a result, WHO and its partners are organizing a study in many countries to compare some untested treatments with each other.

The aim of this large international study is to obtain the reliable data we need to show which treatments are most effective.

We call this study the Solidarity Experiment.

The Solidarity Pilot Project uses simplified procedures to involve even overstretched hospitals.

Many countries have confirmed that they will join the trial, including Argentina, Bahrain, Canada, France, Iran, Norway, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland and Thailand. I believe more countries will join in.

I am encouraged by the strong support from all over the world.

The COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund has now raised more than $43 million from more than 173,000 individuals and organizations in the days since its launch. In particular, I would like to thank FIFA for its donation of $10 million.

The efforts of all parties have given us hope. As long as we stick together, we can and will win.

This virus poses an unprecedented threat to us. But it is also an unprecedented opportunity for us to work together against this common enemy, an enemy that is endangering humanity.

Thank you.

Original title: WHO: China’s first vaccine trial has begun, an incredible achievement