Scientists create 2D additives to make calcium-titanium solar cells more durable

The sun is an important source of energy, but these rays can certainly cause damage, according tomedia. Engineers in South Korea have now developed a new way to make calcium-titanium-type solar cells to protect them from elements without compromising their efficiency.

Scientists create 2D additives to make calcium-titanium solar cells more durable

The crystal structure of the titanium-titanium ore material can effectively absorb the energy from the sun. They can be modified to absorb more wavelengths of light, making them more efficient. Unfortunately, this is also their drawback, making the material more susceptible to prolonged exposure to heat, moisture, oxygen and light. Considering that these are all exposure to the sun all day, this is a real problem.

As a result, a team of researchers from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Seoul National University and Sejong University set out to modify the material to improve its hardness. To do this, the team carefully mixed molecules made of ammonium phenyethiethyl into a two-dimensional layer inside the calcium-titanium mine. This improves the efficiency and durability of solar cells, including solar cells made only from calcium titanium ore and other solar cells that place calcium titanium ore on top of the silicon layer.

Scientists create 2D additives to make calcium-titanium solar cells more durable

The researchers reported that their all-calcium titanium solar cells had a peak conversion efficiency of 20.7 percent and remained 80 percent efficient after 1,000 hours of continuous use. When paired with silicon, the efficiency increased to 26.7%, not far from the current record of 27.7%, and has similar durability.

“We developed high-quality broadband gap calcium titanium ore material and combined with silicon solar cells to obtain world-class calcium-titanium-silicon series batteries,” said Byungha Shingha Shingha, lead researcher on the study. “Our ultimate goal is to develop ultra-efficient series solar cells to facilitate the growth of shared solar energy across all energy sources. “

The team says it plans to limit efficiency and wants to push through 30 per cent beyond the reach of engineers for years, but it is still theoretically feasible.

The study was published in the journal Science.