Scientists find two mating flies in amber dating back tens of millions of years

Two mating flies found in amber prove that some of Australia’s oldest fossils are preserved in amber, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Nature,media CNET reported. They are also potential candidates for the first freezing of mating in the Australian fossil record. The study, led by a team from Monash University’s School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment in Melbourne, found not only the flies.

Scientists find two mating flies in amber dating back tens of millions of years

The researchers also found the oldest fossilant ants from southern Gunwana, Australia’s first winged hexagon fossil – known as the “slim jumping bug” – and included some spiders, two ground ginsengs, two moss and a bite-bitten mosquito, all contained in amber.

“Amber is considered the ‘holy grail’ of the discipline because organisms are preserved in a suspended animation state in perfect 3D space, just as they died yesterday,” monash University paleontologist Jeffrey Stilwell, lead author of the study, said in a press release. But in fact (they) are tens of millions of years old, providing us with a wealth of information about ancient terrestrial ecosystems. “

Scientists find two mating flies in amber dating back tens of millions of years

The team, made up of scientists from Australia, Spain, Italy and the UK, studied amber fragments found in Macquarie Harbour Formation in Tasmania and Anglesea Coal Measures in Victoria. They date back 50 million and 40 million years ago, respectively.

“This study gives us a better understanding of the prehistoric southern ecosystems of Australia and New Zealand from the late Triassic to the mid-Palaeonto (234-40 million years ago),” Mr Stilwell said. “

Mr Stilwell continued: “Our findings provide exciting new insights into the origin, ancient and evolutionary origins, ancientand ness of modern Australian biomes and suggest that australia and New Zealand may have great potential for similar discoveries in the future. “