Study says new coronavirus pandemic makes whole planet quieter

According tomedia BGR reported that the new coronavirus pandemic has caused great social changes. For many people, everyday life is different today, and these changes seem to have extended to our planet itself. We’ve seen examples of areas with high levels of air pollution that have improved dramatically as people stay at home for long periods of time. Now researchers have observed a new phenomenon: the Earth is actually becoming quieter.

Study says new coronavirus pandemic makes whole planet quieter

As Newsweek reported, researchers have noticed a significant reduction in the amount of vibration on the Earth’s surface. This “seismic noise” is generated by human movements such as driving, building work and anything else that can cause ground shaking. But since the coVID-19 pandemic began, the planet has become much quieter.

As the new coronavirus pandemic spreads around the world, many places have adopted blockades. Even in areas where there are no strict restrictions, social gatherings are urged to avoid social gatherings and stay at home as much as possible. Because many countries follow these new rules, these background noises are much less.

Stephen Hicks, a seismologist at Imperial College London, revealed on Twitter the results of seismic data collection that showed things had calmed down. Hicks wrote: “The effect of the blocking effect of the seismometer was seen at the scovid19uk. The average daytime background seismic noise decreased this week. He added that the data “may reflect a reduction in traffic on the roads.” “

Study says new coronavirus pandemic makes whole planet quieter

When researchers take seismic readings, they usually have to take into account the steady hum of background noise anyway. But the directives on self-segregation and social isolation have largely changed this situation. The quiet frequency during this time is usually associated with daily human life, which means that now may be a great opportunity for scientists to capture some particularly accurate readings without worrying about too much human interference that will confuse the data.