Zensors to provide free activity monitoring technology to airports in response to new coronavirus outbreak

Computer vision technology for commercial purposes is becoming a valuable tool for monitoring people’s behavior during the current new pandemic,media reported. Zensors is a start-up that uses machine learning to track restaurant usage, queues, and more. Now, the company is offering its platform free of charge to airports and other places that urgently need to adopt this type of system to prevent infection.

Zensors to provide free activity monitoring technology to airports in response to new coronavirus outbreak

Zensors, founded two years ago, was one of the first companies to use computer vision technology as a means of extracting value from information such as security camera signals. It now seems that cameras in restaurants can and should record empty tables and track data over time, but that wasn’t easy a few years ago.

Since then, Zensors has built a set of tools for specific businesses and spaces such as airports, offices and retail environments. They can count the number of empty seats and seats that someone sits in, find trash, estimate the number of queues and so on. Coincidentally, given current measurements of social distance, these are the types of data that space managers are now so eager to get.

Zensors co-founder Anuraag Jain told Carnegie Mellon University, a company that was spun off from Carnegie Mellon University, that it had received a lot of advice from agencies such as airports that wanted to apply the technology to public health.

Zensors to provide free activity monitoring technology to airports in response to new coronavirus outbreak

Using the software’s party count, it can estimate the distance between people, and the system alerts if too many people gather in the same area or pass through a small space.

In addition, the system can now answer specific questions about the new coronapneumonia, such as whether there are too many people in an area, when the last cleaning is, whether cleaning should be accelerated, and how many people in a particular group wear masks.

While this is a less structured approach, the system may help keep public clean sesame and reduce the risk of virus transmission and infection.