Jaunt ROSA: EVTOL air taxis that don’t require special certification and make people feel safe

According tomedia reports, Jaunt Air Mobility’s Reduced Rotor Operating Aircraft (ROSA) eVTOL air taxi is designed to look like a strange helicopter/aircraft hybrid, and it’s probably the safest of all the eVTOL designs ever seen, and it has a very big advantage: it doesn’t require special certification.

Jaunt ROSA: EVTOL air taxis that don't require special certification and make people feel safe

This is huge news for the emerging 3D commuter market because it can make it much more expensive to start, and the two main obstacles for eVTOL designers to design this travel tool are safety and certification.

Jaunt ROSA: EVTOL air taxis that don't require special certification and make people feel safe

Jaunt Air Mobility is a start-up founded in 2018, but it hasn’t caught the public’s attention until now. The company’s ROSA is large, looks awkward, with a top rotor that resembles a helicopter, a large and wide wing — the size of a small aircraft. Obviously, it doesn’t look as cool as other eVTOLs like Lilium, Joby or Skai, but it’s quite a great flight ability.

ROSA uses a huge, slow top rotor to fly the VTOL, which does not require a tail oar to balance the torque of the main rotor, which has four large electric pillars. These devices allow the aircraft to hover without getting caught in the tail spin, and then provide forward thrust to allow the aircraft to reach cruising speed. Once it reaches a certain speed, the top rotor is completely unloaded for low resistance and high efficiency, as the wing produces lift.

It is understood that ROSA was built on the design of Carter Copter and that Jaunt has acquired all the rights to Carter Aviation Rotor Master. Carter’s four-seat Personal Air Vehicle demo aircraft has completed more than 1,000 take-off stakes and landings and 100 hours of test flights, during which time it has a speed of 214 mph (344 Km/h) and an altitude of 18,000 feet.

Jaunt ROSA: EVTOL air taxis that don't require special certification and make people feel safe

As for safety, ROSA can land safely like a helicopter with automatic rotation. If all the power is gone, the top rotor will still provide enough lift, so it will allow the aircraft to land slowly and controlledly, regardless of altitude or air speed. This is definitely a huge advantage.

In terms of certification, it meets an existing category, the “rotor propeller aircraft”, which allows it to be certified according to the requirements of the FAA Part 29 rotor. Although the U.S. hasn’t certified a rotary-wing propeller aircraft for decades, both aviation engineers and regulators themselves are well aware of the Part 29 rules. Jaunt has designed an easy-to-certify aircraft that fundamentally reduces the cost of putting the aircraft into full commercial use.

Slow top rotors can make the aircraft quieter, especially when flying on a cruise. Noise reduction will be an important goal in this area, especially if the flying team starts transporting people in urban areas. Jaunt expects the aircraft’s noise levels to be 50 to 66 percent lower than regular helicopters or fixed-wing aircraft.

Another key benefit of ROSA design is its low periodic maintenance requirements. The top rotor does not use bearingors or pitch connections as a helicopter. Jaunt says they are using elastic materials, a simple, clean, bearing-free design that should have a long gap between inspection requirements, which will help further reduce operating costs.

ANOTHER OF ROSA’S SKILLS IS LEVELFLY TECHNOLOGY, WHICH CONTROLS THE ENTIRE TOWER OF THE MAIN ROTOR, SO THAT THE CABIN CAN EASILY BALANCE NO MATTER HOW MANY PASSENGERS THERE ARE ON BOARD AND WHEREVER THEY SIT. This also helps to maintain cabin comfort during the transition between vertical take-off and winged flights, and in other vertical take-off and landing designs, complex phases may involve some rather uncomfortable tilts.

Jaunt ROSA: EVTOL air taxis that don't require special certification and make people feel safe

Jaunt is understood to be run by a number of very serious and rigorous engineers, CEO Kaydon Stanzione is a senior engineer at Boeing, an expert consultant on the US Department of Defense VTOL aircraft program, a US/NATO test pilot and engineer, a continuous inventor in multiple disciplines, a successful entrepreneur and author, CTO Martin Peryea, a former vice president of engineering at Aerospace Structures, vice president of business engineering at Bell Helicopters, and chairman and chief engineer of the Bell 525 Product Safety Committee. As a result, the company’s flying products are not short of core aviation knowledge.

Jaunt ROSA: EVTOL air taxis that don't require special certification and make people feel safe

The company says it is self-financing and has enough money to move on to the next stage. It is understood that it is one of the chosen partners in the Uber Elevate project, and in order to achieve this goal, Jaunt has partnered with companies such as BAE Systems, Triumph Aerospace Structures and Honeywell.

Of course, there are many unknowns, such as how much range, but its aircraft is expected to be certified in 2023 and commercialized around 2025.