Doctors and engineers work together to turn CPAP devices that improve sleep apnea into ventilators

The FDA has been working to adjust its policies and restrictions in response to a shortage of medical supplies caused by the COVID-19 outbreak caused by the new coronavirus. A team of engineers, medical researchers, and hospital workers from the University of California, Berkeley/San Francisco, has also come up with an innovative design to address the shortage of ventilators. It wants these devices to meet FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) standards and to use existing inventory hardware as much as possible.

Doctors and engineers work together to turn CPAP devices that improve sleep apnea into ventilators

(Pictured from: Donaldsos)

The team, which includes lung care physicians, medical and engineering professors, describes itself as the COVID-19 Respirator Rapid Response Team.

Together, they found a way to modify the CPAP machine, which is commonly used to treat sleep apnea syndrome, to be used in the ICU for much-needed COVID-19 patients with severe COVID-19 respiratory rescue.

It is reported that the original CPAP machine is not suitable for the continued use of patients with severe lung disease who cannot breathe on their own.

The device essentially simply ensures that the patient’s airways do not become blocked during sleep, maintaining oxygen levels to avoid unnecessary wake-up snoring and snoring.

But through a transformation led by a team led by Dr. Ajay Dharia, an intensive care physician focused on ICU lung disease treatment at three Bay Area hospitals, the team has successfully modified the intubation hardware section, which is awaiting final FDA approval.

At the same time, it wants to work with manufacturers on mass production and encourage donations from individuals and other organizations.