Help relieve the pressure of medical devices Researchers use existing first aid kits to develop emergency ventilators

In the face of a growing global pandemic of new coronaviruses, the need for innovative solutions to critical medical equipment shortages is more urgent than ever,media reported, as a new initiative by a global team of biomedical engineering experts is a perfect example. It is reported that the team developed a method, the first aid kit re-used as emergency ventilator hardware.

Help relieve the pressure of medical devices Researchers use existing first aid kits to develop emergency ventilators

Susan Margulies, a professor of biomedical engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University who is a ventilator-related lung injury specialist, said at a recent news conference that while it’s nice to see U.S. manufacturers open-source existing FDA-approved ventilator designs, there’s a simple, low-cost design that actually increases the number of available devices without the need for production line involvement.

It is understood that the device developed by the researchers uses a bag mask (BVM) so that a piece of hardware can work for two patients at the same time. It can be made of stocked metal plate components and plastic gears and powered along with a regular wall adapter or 12-volt car battery, giving it the flexibility to use it in permanent care facilities or temporary field hospitals.

Basically, this change is done by automatically and mechanically squeezing the airbags, which are usually manually squeezed by caregivers to save patients. Mechanical squeezes can last for several days and, when no other ventilator hardware is available, are converted into actionable ventilators for ongoing care for patients with new coronary pneumonia.

It is reported that the design is the result of a collaboration between Cranfield University, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University in the United Kingdom. It has been prototyped and tested and iterated, and now the team behind the concept is working with the Emory University Technical Office to move its designs to a broader manufacturing field.