The Ninggro Submarine Canyon Mission reminds us that the deep sea is the most mysterious and weird place

According tomedia reports, the Schmidt Institute of Oceanography recently shared a video, possibly the largest ever captured jellyfish. It is just the latest in a series of wildlife photographs filmed by deep-sea crews, who are understood to share the creatures living in ningaloo Canyons.

The Ninggro Submarine Canyon Mission reminds us that the deep sea is the most mysterious and weird place

The giant tube jellyfish, provided by the Schmidt Institute of Oceanography in Australia, appeared this week with an outer ring about 49 feet (15 meters) in diameter.

The Ninggro Submarine Canyon Mission reminds us that the deep sea is the most mysterious and weird place

The creatures, or rather, are in a long line, moving toward a goal like a team. Stefan Siebert, a marine biologist at Brown University, explains that while the tube jellyfish that are related to jellyfish may look like an animal, it is actually made up of many parts, consisting of thousands of interconnected clones. Rebecca Helm, a marine biologist at the University of North Carolina in Asheville, said: “In a clone population, a clone can do about 12 different things, and each clone has its own specific task. “

Before arriving at Ningeror Undersea Canyon, staff at the Schmidt Oceanographic Institute had explored Bremer Bay and Perth Gorge.

The Ninggro Submarine Canyon Mission reminds us that the deep sea is the most mysterious and weird place

Here’s a video of the seafloor creatures taken in the past: