This spray sensor turns surfaces into an interface that interacts with you

According tomedia reports, imagine touching the armrest of your sofa to change the TV channel or press the lamp template on the wall to turn on the smart light, and the technology that makes it happen is the Sprayable User user interface developed jointly by MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), the University of Bristol and the University of Bath.

This spray sensor turns surfaces into an interface that interacts with you

The technology combines a top-level design layer with a touch-aware underlying conductive copper ink layer and a microcontroller that connects to and responds to the ink layer. The interface can operate on rough surfaces and surfaces, even on wet outdoor surfaces.

By using special inks, people can basically connect any type of mold design with other gadgets.

“Unlike existing technologies such as 3D printing, screen printing or inkjet printing, spraying technology is not limited by a specific volume and, as graffiti artworks often show, produce output that covers entire walls and even building facades,” the researchers wrote in their paper. Our work helps to integrate digital user interfaces with physical environments and extend them to large-scale interactive interfaces. “

While the technology will take some time to expand and commercialize, it could one day be used in smart buildings – a templated, gun-sprayed design that responds to its touch with people.

This spray sensor turns surfaces into an interface that interacts with you

It’s not just touch- and the ink system can also react to sliding fingers or hands or even just approach, so people can swing their hands in front of the door to turn on the lights and so on. In addition, it can add output in the form of an electroluminescent display.

While these systems require some advanced planning and design to produce the original template and ensure that the conductive ink is properly arranged on a surface, the technology becomes much easier after people have a spray gun.

This spray sensor turns surfaces into an interface that interacts with you

The sprayable user interface technology was supposed to be on display at this year’s ACM CHI Computer System Human Factor conference, but it was cancelled after the new coronavirus pandemic.