Say goodbye to the EV charging station? This P2P charging system may be able to achieve this goal

According tomedia reports, since the aircraft can refuel each other in the air, why electric vehicles (EVs) can not? The University of Florida has come up with the strange and wonderful idea of allowing high-speed escort vehicles to share energy in P2P mode. It is understood that the P2P car charging system (Peer to Peer Car charge, P2C2) system will allow the robot’s charging arm to extend to connect when the self-driving car is driving on the highway, charging another car with the battery of one car.

Say goodbye to the EV charging station? This P2P charging system may be able to achieve this goal

“We envision a safe, insulated, robust telescopic arm to carry the charging cable,” the Florida team wrote in a published paper. The heads of these arms will have charging ports that will be locked together by magnetic pads or other means. “Mechanical connections are a way to transfer charge, but wireless inductive charging can also be an option.

Say goodbye to the EV charging station? This P2P charging system may be able to achieve this goal

For individual car owners, they rarely use up all of their batteries in their daily use, which eliminates the need to park at the charging station and charge quickly. A credit system ensures that no one uses the energy that others pay for it, and then the entire transportation ecosystem becomes a huge shared battery, and no one needs to stop to recharge their journey.

For operators of robotic taxi fleets such as Uber Autonomous, the benefits can be huge. They can meet a big battery car on their way to their next destination and use it to charge themselves instead of stopping — which is important for operators because stopping means no economic benefits.

For this purpose, the team is understood to have built a model of a mobile charging truck system that includes multi-density traffic simulations, vehicle weight, off-road and road charging rates, and a basic scheduling algorithm that allows analog robot taxis to make calls when they need to charge. Currently, the simulation system shows some impressive results – a 65 per cent reduction in vehicle parking, a 25 per cent reduction in required battery capacity, and no additional parking.