U.S. meat supply is getting tighter: burgers don’t have burgers, supermarkets open to shopping…

Some restaurants at burger chain Wendy’s Co have removed its signature burgers from their menus as a shortage of meat sweeps across the United States, Bloomberg reported. Customers have complained on Twitter that they can’t order burgers at their restaurants. Wendy’s has touted its beef as fresh and never frozen in past marketing.

Original title: U.S. meat supply is getting tighter! Burgers don’t have hamburgers, supermarkets open limited purchases…

U.S. meat supply is getting tighter: burgers don't have burgers, supermarkets open to shopping...

Turning on Wendy’s mobile app can be seen, at least in some of its Stores in California, only chicken products are available for takeaway. This has led many customers to quiver on social media and ask, “Where’s the beef?” (Where’s the beef? )

U.S. meat supply is getting tighter: burgers don't have burgers, supermarkets open to shopping...

It’s a stem – in the 1980s Wendy’s used to make fun of the small size of burgers sold by other chains…

Wendy’s has spent years establishing itself as the first large fast-food chain to offer fresh, never-frozen beef. Rivals such as McDonald’s are following suit. The shift has made some companies more vulnerable to disruptions in the U.S. beef supply chain than those that still rely on imports of beef from Australia and other countries.

For Wendy’s, however, the supply shortage so far seems to have affected only some areas. For example, products such as Bacon CheeseBurger can still be ordered in Chicago.

In addition to “hamburgers without hamburgers”, some of the largest U.S. supermarkets have now opened a meat-restricted model! Costco, the largest U.S. member-based supermarket chain, announced on Monday that it would limit purchases of beef, pork and poultry. Kroger, America’s largest supermarket chain, announced similar rules last week.

Global FX reported last week that the U.S. is now facing a shortage of meat at grocery stores after an outbreak of the coronavirus led to the closure of major processing plants, and that pork, beef and chicken could disappear from grocery store shelves and restaurant menus. Meanwhile, U.S. pork industry and agricultural regulators are discussing the prospect of euthanasia of thousands of pigs.

Last month, about ahalftoirs were closed because of a virus infection among employees. The union said last week that 20 meat processing workers had died. Factory shutdowns resulted in a 25% reduction in the slaughter of pigs and a 10% reduction in the slaughter of cattle.

Tyson, one of the largest Meat Processors in the U.S., announced Thursday that its meat processing output is expected to remain affected because of workers’ difficulties, and that it does not rule out continuing to shut down some factories for in-depth disinfection.