Statistical model predicts a sharp increase in the number of new crown deaths if U.S. states reopen prematurely

A new report based on data from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton Budget Model (PWBM) suggests that an additional 233,000 new coronavirus-related deaths could be caused by premature easing of the embargo in u.S. states,media BGR reported. Of course, this is a shocking number, but it helps to underscore the importance of taking a cautious approach when returning to normal daily life. Even if the current blockade remains in place, PWBM says new crown-confirmed cases in the United States could reach 2.3 million by the end of June and kill 117,000 people. As things stand, there have been more than 1.2 million new crown-confirmed cases in the United States, resulting in more than 71,000 deaths.

Statistical model predicts a sharp increase in the number of new crown deaths if U.S. states reopen prematurely

The model predicts that in an absolute worst-case scenario, if each state immediately removes home-based orders and maintains social segregation rules, the number of new crown-confirmed cases will reach 8 million and lead to 350,000 deaths. But many U.S. states are taking the pandemic seriously and do not plan to ease security measures within weeks.

The reality is that it will be predicted what will happen in light of the reopening states. While some states have adopted a conservative approach and will maintain all restrictions and social distance guidelines by early June, others have begun to relax restrictions. Arizona, for example, will allow retail stores to reopen from Friday.

The central problem with premature relaxation of restrictions is that the new coronavirus is more efficient and spreading more widely than other influenza viruses. This, combined with the fact that many people are asymptomatic, can easily lead to a second wave of outbreaks that may be more dangerous. It is for this reason that a recent report by the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota says a new coronavirus pandemic could last two years.