Average temperature rises by 7.5 degrees C By 2070 30% of the world’s population will live in extreme heat

As the global climate continues to warm, will there be a day when the earth becomes uninhabitable because of widespread heat? A study published may 4 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that by 2070, one-third of the world’s population could face extreme heat. Scientists have found that for 6,000 years, most humans lived in relatively narrow climate zones, where the average annual temperature was around 11-15 degrees Celsius. A small number of people live in areas where the average annual temperature is 20-25 degrees Celsius.

Average temperature rises by 7.5 degrees C By 2070 30% of the world's population will live in extreme heat

It is reported that for every 1 degree Celsius increase in the average global temperature, about 1 billion people lose their suitable climatic conditions.

The average temperature of the human environment will rise by 7.5 degrees Celsius by 2070, about 2.3 times the global average, due to warming due to warming, compared with the pre-industrial period 300 years ago.

This means that in 50 years’ time, nearly a third of the world’s population could live in temperatures above 29 degrees Celsius, with nearly 3.5 billion people facing extreme heat.

Currently, only 0.8 per cent of the world’s regions fall into such extreme climatic conditions, mostly concentrated in the Sahara Desert.

As the average global temperature rises, such high temperature zones are expected to expand significantly to about 19 percent of the world’s population and nearly 3.5 billion people by 2070.

The paper says migration is a possibility to tackle climate change, but measures to rapidly reduce greenhouse gas emissions could reduce the theoretical number of people who need to migrate to about 1.5 billion.

The study was conducted by researchers from Nanjing University in China, Washington State University in the United States, Aarhus University in Denmark, University of Exeter in the United Kingdom, and wwahningen in the Netherlands.