Existing drugs may help save victims bitten by poisonous snakes, study suggests

According tomedia reports, when someone is bitten by a poisonous snake, as soon as possible injection of the snake anti-snake serum is the key. However, in order for victims to survive during this period, it turns out that existing drugs may work. Because most commonly used antibiotics are administered clinically intravenously, they cannot be used in the wild or in farmland, where snake bites occur. Therefore, there is not much that the person caring for the victim can do much, other than to bandage the wound and rush the victim to the hospital. Also, it is not recommended that they try to suck out the venom.

Existing drugs may help save victims bitten by poisonous snakes, study suggests

Scientists at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, led by Professor Nicholas Casewell, began studying whether there was a drug that could be taken orally in the field to minimize the effects of the venom. They found that an existing heavy metal poisoning treatment drug called DMPS (2,3-dipyrion-1-propyreude) significantly inhibited the in vitro activity of the in vitro enzyme of the saw-scale venomous snake. It is a type of snake found in different parts of Africa and Asia and is thought to have caused more deaths than all other snakes combined.

Existing drugs may help save victims bitten by poisonous snakes, study suggests

In laboratory mouse trials, the researchers determined that the drug worked by binding to metal ions in the victim’s body. This makes it impossible for zinc ions to be used by venom, which relies on zinc ions to function. “Because DMPS is an oral drug, trained volunteers can administer the drug immediately in the community after being bitten by a snake,” said lead author Dr. Laura-Oana Albulescu, who led the study. “This would be a huge advantage and help reduce the incidence of lesions, as it can take up to several hours for victims of snake bites to reach a medical facility.” “

The paper was published Wednesday in the journal Science Translational Medicine.