New uses for fruit waste: helps extract better-quality polymers from crustacean shells

According tomedia reports, crustaceanshell found in the shell is a natural polymer, processing will have a variety of uses. Now, scientists have developed a fermentation process based on fruit waste that can be extracted from the shell, and the technique can also produce better crustaceans.

New uses for fruit waste: helps extract better-quality polymers from crustacean shells

Crustaceans (and its derivative shell polysaccharides) have received wide attention in recent years. The substance is biodegradable and biocompatible, and it provides a use for seafood waste that canonlye and can only be thrown into landfills if it cannot be disposed of. Recent studies have shown that it can be used for compostable food packaging, wound dressings and even self-healing car paint.

Typically, crustaceans in crustacean shells are extracted through acid processing. However, according to researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, this method is expensive, consumes a lot of electricity and can produce toxic waste that enters waterways.

In search of greener alternatives, they instead tried to combine shrimp shells with a variety of bacteria and fruit waste. The idea is that glucose in fruit speeds up the fermentation process, chemically breaking down the shell layer so that crustaceans can be easily extracted. The researchers used a total of 10 different types of fruit waste, including grape peels, apple peels, mango peels, pineapple kernels and banana skins.

New uses for fruit waste: helps extract better-quality polymers from crustacean shells

This technique proved to be very effective, and when subsequent analysis of the harvested crustacean was analyzed, it was found that its “crystallisability index” (measured by purity) reached 98.16%. By contrast, the index of crustacean samples obtained by traditional means was only 87.56 per cent.

“Our research not only improves the quality of crustaceans, but also makes their production processes more sustainable and environmentally friendly,” said lead scientist Professor William Chen. It is also a cost-effective way to operate on an industrial scale, which could attract interest from wineries that want to reduce and upgrade waste. “

The study was published in AMB Express.