WHO: Vaccine 184 to eliminate Smallpoan new coronavirus may repeat history

Vaccine research has entered clinical trials, which gives us hope, but the World Health Organization (WHO) does not seem to be optimistic about it. “On 8 May 1980, the World Health Assembly officially announced the removal of smallpox, 40 years after today,” Who’s Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a press conference on 8 May 1980. But smallpox has plagued humanity for at least 3,000 years, claiming more than 300 million lives in the 20th century alone.” Vaccine research for the new coronavirus has entered the clinical stage.

WHO: Vaccine 184 to eliminate Smallpoan new coronavirus may repeat history

“The victory of the battle between humanity and smallpox is a reminder that nothing is impossible when nations of the world come together to fight common health threats,” he said. “To achieve the goal of eliminating the epidemic, we still need to use a number of strategies to combat the new coronavirus, including case detection, contact detection, and so on. But we still lack a key tool: vaccines. This is also the direction and goal that WHO and many organizations and researchers are working on.

But he claims that even if an effective coronavirus vaccine is eventually available and widely available, we still have some way to go to eradicate the new coronavirus. For now, smallpox remains the only human disease eradicated globally. It is worth noting that it took 184 years to eradicate smallpox from the first vaccine developed in 1796 to the eradication of smallpox in 1980.

“Global solidarity is the decisive factor in defeating smallpox,” Tedros said. At the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union and the United States united to defeat a common enemy. Because they recognize that the virus knows no borders or race. Now more than ever, the unity of the nations of the world is needed and the same clear understanding is needed to finally overcome the new coronavirus. “