Researchers have found a new way to treat victims bitten by poisonous snakes

A new study says an oral drug for victims bitten by a venom ousise can inhibit the absorption of venom, giving them more time to seek appropriate treatment,media BGR reported. According to the World Health Organization ,80,000 to 140,000 people die each year from snake bites. Historically, to bring this number down to a lower level, one of the inherent problems is that snake bites often occur in the wild and require proper treatment, often clinically intravenous antivenom. However, a new study may provide a new treatment that could help victims of snake bites stay on end until they are properly treated.

Researchers have found a new way to treat victims bitten by poisonous snakes

According to a new study by the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, giving people bitten by poisonous snakes “dipyriapropanol and its derivatives 2,3-dipyrichlor-1-propyreunocence (DMPS)” can temporarily inhibit the efficacy of venomous snake bites. In addition, the drug was later found to be more effective when used in combination with traditional antivenom drugs.

The team’s paper suggests that DMPS can be reused as an oral drug to treat snake bite victims shortly after being bitten by a snake before the person is taken to a medical facility. While an injection of antivenom may still be required once a patient reaches the clinic, early use of DMPS treatment in the world’s poorest communities has the potential to save lives and limbs by eliminating treatment delays.

“The advantage of using a compound like DMPS is that it is already a licensed drug that has proven to be safe and inexpensive,” said researcher Professor Nicholas Casewell. “It effectively moderates the role of saw-scale python venom in the model, highlighting the drug’s prospects as an early, pre-hospital, therapeutic intervention.” “