Which emoji bag did people like most during the outbreak?

BEIJING, May 12 (Xinhua) — Many people have chosen to express their caution with the emoji “face wearing a medical mask” during an outbreak that has become a luxury, according to CNN. (as shown in the figure below)

Which emoji bag did people like most during the outbreak?

But the emoji softens the complex feeling that hope and fear are intertwined, and it’s a “hands-on-” expression that appears on Twitter more often than ever before. (as shown in the figure below)

Which emoji bag did people like most during the outbreak?

It helps to express our feelings about all aspects of this outbreak, which are sometimes unspeakable. It can be used to thank front-line staff, pray to loved ones, and even thank you for finding toilet paper on supermarket shelves.

The emoji, sometimes referred to as the “prayer hand,” used 25 percent more frequently in April than in August, according to Emojipedia. Emojipedia tracks trends and frequencies of emoji emojis on Twitter. The surge made it one of the most popular emojis in April and became one of the most emplaced symbols of the outbreak among netizens.

With the increase in the number of new coronavirus cases and the spread of blockades around the world, the way people communicate is rapidly evolving. The Slack conversation replaced the conversation at the water dispenser’s edge. The party and birthday party have now moved to Zoom. The days of everyone talking on the phone are back. In online communication, people increasingly rely on emojis to express their thoughts and attitudes.

“We use emojis to express how we feel about this outbreak, essentially a body language in the digital age,” Vyvan Evans, author of Emoji Code: The Linguistics Behind Smiley Faces and Scary Cats, told CNN Business. We use language to convey ideas, but as time goes on, some of the meanings are missing, and words have nuances, such as tone and expression. “

According to Emojipedia, nearly one in five Twitter users use emojis, compared with one in six in the same period last year. Symbols such as “face with a medical mask”, “bacteria” and “soap” are also often found in communication with the new coronavirus. (as shown in the figure below)

Which emoji bag did people like most during the outbreak?

Which emoji bag did people like most during the outbreak?

Which emoji bag did people like most during the outbreak?

Interestingly, the frequency of emojis using “airplanes” and “tennis” decreased because people chose to stay at home. (as shown in the figure below)

Which emoji bag did people like most during the outbreak?

Which emoji bag did people like most during the outbreak?

On other platforms, this interest in emojis has increased even more. Google told CNN Business Channel that the use of emojionons on Google’s Android app increased by more than 60 percent between January and March.

However, the classic emoji is still active. Emojipedia found that the most popular emoji was still “laughing and crying” (shown below), which was named the Oxford Dictionaries’ 2015 emoji of the year. Jeremy Burge, emoji’s chief emoji officer, points out that while the company can’t track private communications such as text messages or WhatsApp, the trend is highly relevant.

Which emoji bag did people like most during the outbreak?

The popularity of emojis highlights the problems that plagued people during the outbreak of the new coronavirus disease: more attention has been paid to whether local grocery stores can buy toilet paper or medical supplies than to travel abroad;

With the new coronavirus emoji “not enough,” some people have shown their creativity in the outbreak using existing emojis. In Spain, for example, there has been widespread concern that people have put crown expressions and bacterial expressions together to represent “coronaviruses”.

Others opted for emojis similar to “hands-on-to-be”, which first appeared on smartphones in the United States in 2012. Long before the outbreak, it was used to represent many things, from clapping and clapping to symbols of gratitude or prayer. Kim Kardashian used the emoji on Twitter in 2014 after appearing on the cover of Vogue. Last year, the NBA’s Phoenix Suns official also used the expression while celebrating National High Day.

On Apple’s iOS platform, an earlier version of the “hands-in-ten” emoji featured a light from a finger, which could indicate a clapping celebration, or a prayer symbol with a halo. On Android, it once had a version of the character, usually associated with Western Christian prayer.

In any case, in this particular time of the epidemic, we can no longer live without emojis like “hands-on-the-line” (shown below). (Author/Good)

Which emoji bag did people like most during the outbreak?