Long March V B rocket core re-entry over the Atlantic Ocean 102 times around earth

After completing its mission, the Long March V’s long-core first-sector return to the atmosphere in the Atlantic Ocean on the night of 11 May. The U.S. Air Force’s 18th Space Control Squadron, which is responsible for detecting, tracking and identifying low-orbiting man-made objects, said in the early hours of May 12, Beijing time, that China’s Long March 5 B rocket core was deorbited over the Atlantic Ocean on May 11 after completing its mission and re-entered the Atlantic Ocean near the west coast of Africa at about 23:33 BST. The core circle sits around the Earth up to 102 times.

Long March V B rocket core re-entry over the Atlantic Ocean 102 times around earth

U.S. Space Force Twitter Screenshot

Previously, on May 5, China’s Wenchang space launch site, the Long March 5 B carrier rocket ignited, a new generation of manned spacecraft test ship and other payload sent into a predetermined orbit, to achieve the space station phase of the first mission, opened China’s manned space engineering “third step” mission. Unlike the Long March V A type, the Long March 5 b-type removes the core level two, which is a “first-level semi-level (core-level plus booster)” configuration, which provides thrust from two YF-77s and eight YF-100s.

Jonathan McDowell, a well-known U.S. space expert, has previously said that the Long March V B carrier rocket core is the largest uncontrolled fall of man-made objects after the Soviet Union’s 39-ton “Gift-7” spacecraft re-entered the atmosphere in 1991.