Study: Bleached corals appear to be able to recover with neon pigment shields

In good health, corals are tawny, green, red and other shades, which in short make our eyes feel “natural,” according tomedia. In a healthy state, the coral’s yellow-brown symbiotic pigment absorbs blue light. Bleached corals are caused by temperature, light, pollution such as carbon and other factors.

Study: Bleached corals appear to be able to recover with neon pigment shields

A recent survey of bleached corals showed some strange changes in coral reefs — bright, almost unnatural colors showed corals that had previously been bleached into bone colors.

Corals are started to grow from a seaweed called algae and multiply on it. The algae depend on photosynthesis to survive, providing energy for coral growth and reproduction. When corals are stressed, algae are drained, and we see “bleaching”. This is the color of the coral’s internal structure.

Study: Bleached corals appear to be able to recover with neon pigment shields

Once the coral is “bleached”, the internal blue flux increases. For some corals, the next step is to increase the amount of blue light to induce an increase in host pigment. It’s almost like these neon hues are the “real” colors of coral.

Colored bleached corals are displayed as “screens” to create their own light, which allows for the adjustment of internal blue light. This new protection is provided by wild, bright, “natural” tones that promote the recovery of symbiotic algae.

Study: Bleached corals appear to be able to recover with neon pigment shields

In a recent study on the subject, researchers found that shallower corals produce more protective pigments. The deeper the coral, the less pigment it produces. Different kinds of corals can show different tones, sometimes very different in very close places.

Study: Bleached corals appear to be able to recover with neon pigment shields

“The report shows that colorful bleaching events occurred in parts of the Great Barrier Reef in March and April 2020, so patches of the world’s largest coral reef system may have better prospects for recovery after recent bleaching,” Saido Wiedenmann, director of the Coral Reef Laboratory at the University of Southampton and senior research fellow at the Coral Reef Laboratory at the University of Southampton, wrote in Science Alert. “

The study was published in Current Biology.