Where was the sun born? The Milky Way’s ‘close encounter’ with dwarf galaxies 5 billion years ago

BEIJING, May 28 (Xinhua) — According tomedia reports, Spanish scientists now say the birth of the sun was caused by a close-range collision between the Milky Way and the smaller constellation of Manma 5 billion years ago, an event that began with the birth of life on Earth.

When scientists looked at the Galaxy’s milky galaxy data from the Gaia satellite, they found a surge in the number of stars in the Milky Way about 5.7 billion years ago, 1.9 billion years ago, and 1 billion years ago, which is closely related to the collision of the Constellation of Manand galaxy with the Milky Way.

Analysis of the age of the solar system’s neighboring stars shows that at least three collisions occurred in the Milky Way, each of which soon formed a stellar explosion in the Milky Way, causing a series of ripple events, one of which led to the formation of the sun 4.7 billion years ago.

The discovery is based on observations by the European Space Agency’s Gaia satellite, which aims to create a 3D map of the Milky Way. Study author Dr. Tomas Ruiz-Lara of the Canary Islands Institute of Astrophysics (IAC) said that based on existing models, the constellation Maroons dwarf galaxy collided with the Milky Way three times, the first occurred 5-6 billion years ago, the second occurred 2 billion years ago, and the third was discovered 1 billion years ago.

Where was the sun born? The Milky Way's 'close encounter' with dwarf galaxies 5 billion years ago

The constellation Ofscan dwarf galaxy consists of four globular clusters about 10,000 light-years in diameter, while the globular clusters that make up the Milky Way are more than 100,000 light-years in diameter.

When scientists looked at the Galaxy’s milky galaxy data from the Gaia satellite, they found a surge in the number of stars in the Milky Way about 5.7 billion years ago, 1.9 billion years ago, and 1 billion years ago, which is closely related to the collision of the Constellation dwarf galaxy with the Milky Way.

The researchers looked at the brightness, distance and color of stars in the 6,500-light-year radius of the sun and compared the data with existing models of stellar evolution, consisting of four globular clusters about 10,000 light-years in diameter and globular clusters in the Milky Way galaxy more than 100,000 light-years in diameter.

Despite the huge volume differences, Thomas believes that a collision with a dwarf galaxy like the Constellation of Man could create a star-breeding effect in the Milky Way.

“The original Milky Way was relatively calm, and after the initial period of intense star birth, the star’s birth was partly triggered by early mergers, but the Milky Way has reached equilibrium and stars are able to breed steadily,” he said. Suddenly the dwarf galaxy of the constellation Sagido suddenly collapsed, disrupting the balance, causing the Milky Way’s previously stationary gas and dust to drift around like a ripple on the surface of the water. “

In some parts of the Milky Way, these ripples cause the concentration of dust and gas in galaxies to increase, while dust and gas in other regions are emptied, and high-density material in this region can trigger the birth of new stars, such as the sun.

Study co-author Dr. Carme Gallart said it appeared that the constellation Ofsa not only shaped the structure of the Milky Way, but also influenced the dynamics of the star’s movement in the Milky Way, which led to its formation. It now appears that an important link in the mass formation of stars in the Milky Way is related to the interaction of the dwarf galaxy, otherwise stars like the sun would not have existed.

Galliat argues that the sun and other planets in the solar system would not have been born had it not been for the fact that the constellation Mareson had been bound by the gravitational pull of the Milky Way and crushed its disk. As the constellation Ofasak dwarf galaxy first came into contact with the Milky Way 5-6 billion years ago, it gave birth to a number of stars such as the sun.

We don’t know whether some of the gas dust clouds created by the collapse effect of the constellation Ofasco were causing the sun to form, but it is possible that the age of the sun coincides with the time when the dwarf dwarf steamof of the constellation of Sagi?o first came into contact with the Milky Way 5-6 billion years ago.

In 1994, astronomers discovered that the constellation of Samaritans stripped the Milky Way every time it collided, making it smaller. Available data suggest that the constellation Ofasd dwarf galaxy may have been very quietly exposed to the Milky Way hundreds of millions of years ago.

Astronomers believe the constellation Ofs a few galaxies could be fully absorbed by the Milky Way, a process that has begun, and the Gaia satellite has helped scientists discover several major collisions between the Milky Way and neighboring galaxies in the long history of the universe.

About 8-11 billion years ago, another galaxy collided with the Milky Way, causing the Milky Way to swell and fill its disk with stars, while the Milky Way encountered another “ghost galaxy” that left gravitational ripples in the hydrogen matter of the “ghost galaxy.”

The latest study is published in the recent issue of the Journal of Nature Astronomy.