Google adds anxiety self-assessment to search

Google is working with the non-profit Organization for Mental Illness to provide users with more mental health resources, including a clinically proven self-assessment of anxiety, according tomedia CNET. Starting Thursday, google users in the U.S. will be directed to google’s knowledge panel for self-assessment, a key fact and information box at the top of search results, as they search for information about anxiety. Medically verified information about symptoms of anxiety and common treatments also appears in the box.

Google adds anxiety self-assessment to search

The assessment, known as the GeneralIty Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) (GAD-7), will ask seven questions that health care providers may ask when screening for anxiety disorders. The assessment will also provide resources to be developed by NAMI.

Google adds anxiety self-assessment to search

Anxiety affects 48 million adults in the United States. “The symptoms of anxiety disorders are widespread, may be the result of biological factors, or they may be caused by changes in the environment or exposure to stress events,” Said Daniel H. Gillison Jr., CHIEF Executive Officer of NAMI, in a press release. As COVID-19 introduces new stress points, the community is seeing an increase in mental health problems and demand. “

Google adds anxiety self-assessment to search

New data released last week by the U.S. Census Bureau shows that one-third of Americans have signs of clinical anxiety or depression. Anxiety self-assessment is the third mental health screening program offered by Google Search. NAMI has previously worked with Google to provide clinically proven questionnaires and resources for depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Google says it does not collect or share answers to the results of the questionnaire to ensure the privacy and security of the results.