Asteroid hits Earth at steep angle, killing dinosaurs: its impact is more lethal

BEIJING, June 1 (Xinhua) — Burning asteroids hit the Earth at the worst angle (for dinosaurs) and led to the extinction of dinosaur species, according tomedia reports. In any case, a collision with a giant, fast-moving cosmic projectile would be catastrophic, but researchers have recently found that the giant asteroid hit Earth at a steep angle 66 million years ago, resulting in the release of a large amount of gas and powder, which is more lethal than a “light collision.”

Asteroid hits Earth at steep angle, killing dinosaurs: its impact is more lethal

  1, researchers recently found that 66 million years ago, the huge asteroid hit the Earth at a steep angle, resulting in a large amount of gas and powder released, the impact effect is more lethal than the “light collision.”

The scientists simulated the orbit path of the meteorite’s impact on Earth, creating a 3D model that tracked the event, from the meteorite approaching, to the collision, to the formation of the entire huge crater. The study found that the meteorite approached the Earth from the northeast and hit it at an incident angle of 60 degrees above the horizon, maximizing the amount of gas in the incoming atmosphere, thus causing a devastating disaster for the global climate.

The 66 million-year-old asteroid collision ended the Middle Ages with a loud bang, triggering global climate change that led to the mass extinction of species and the disappearance of 75 percent of life on Earth, including all non-bird dinosaurs. Traces of the asteroid collision still exist today, and there is a huge circular basin on Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, known as the Chicxulub crater crater, about 200 kilometers in diameter.

Asteroid hits Earth at steep angle, killing dinosaurs: its impact is more lethal

  2, they also examined the asymmetric structure at a depth of 30 meters in the Hicksulube crater and analyzed the direction and angle of the asteroid’s collision with Earth. Although previous studies have simulated the appearance of craters formed by asteroid collisions, this is the first time researchers have used deeper structural data to simulate crater conditions in the post-collision period.

In the researchers’ simulations, they estimated that the asteroid was 17 kilometers in diameter, had a speed of about 43,000 km/h and a density of 2.63 tons per cubic meter.

They also examined the asymmetric structure at a depth of 30 meters in the Hicksulub crater and analyzed the direction and angle of the asteroid’s collision with Earth. Although previous studies have simulated the appearance of craters formed by asteroid collisions, this is the first time researchers have used deeper structural data to simulate crater conditions in the post-collision period. The study traces the formation of crater structures, giving scientists a more accurate understanding of the asteroid’s trajectory, the scientists said in the study.

Based on this latest simulation, researchers can gain access to the size and mass of the ancient asteroid and capture its 60-degree launch angle to the horizon, colliding at tens of thousands of kilometers per hour, which coincides with the structure of the Hicksulube crater.

The simulation showed that the ejections from the collision were the “worst case scenario” for Earth compared to the incident angle of most asteroid collisions, and that the sulfur and carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere were more than three times the amount of sulfur and carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere as other asteroid collisionevents.

Study author Gareth Collins, professor of planetary science at Imperial College London’s Department of Geosciences and Engineering, said the steep collision trajectory was the most deadly blow to life on Earth, releasing more dangerous collision debris into the upper atmosphere and spreading it all over the place, which directly led to winter. The latest study is now published in the May 26 issue of the journal Nature Communications. (Ye Ding Cheng)