His app was flooded with messages from K-pop fans after Dallas police asked for video of the protesters

K-pop fans flooded the software with their favorite artist’s content after the Dallas Police Department asked people to use a special app called iWatch Dallas to send a video of “illegal activity in protests” in the city over the weekend, appearing to temporarily put the reporting system off line,media outlet The Verge reported.

His app was flooded with messages from K-pop fans after Dallas police asked for video of the protesters

The day after the Dallas Police Department posted the initial request on Twitter, a second tweet confirmed that “due to technical difficulties, the iWatch Dallas app will be temporarily released.” “The responses to both tweets were clips of various K-pop ensembles, games such as Animal Crossing, anime GIFs and other pop culture references that called for the request, and later celebrated the closure of the app.

His app was flooded with messages from K-pop fans after Dallas police asked for video of the protesters

According to Buzzfeed News, there are a number of one-star reviews on the app’s landing page on Google Play and Apple’s App Store. The comments, which were accompanied by the hashtag “Black Lives Matter” and the ACAB, represent “all police officers are assholes.” According to Buzzfeed News, it’s unclear whether the traffic from the “viral” movement caused the app to crash or if police took it off the shelves once the increase in activity made it virtually unusable.

His app was flooded with messages from K-pop fans after Dallas police asked for video of the protesters

Protests against police violence erupted across the country last week after Minneapolis police were arrested on suspicion of brutallawing in the death of African-American man George Floyd. Protests in New York, Minneapolis, Atlanta, Dallas, Oakland, Los Angeles, Washington, Seattle and other cities have led to mass arrests and numerous violent incidents against protesters and members of the press.

As protesters gathered, some are creating apps and programs that allow images and videos to be shared, along with measures to protect individuals from detention and other retaliatory measures. There is a tool to “erase” metadata from images and allow selective blurring and blacking of parts of the image to help protect protesters from the different surveillance techniques that law enforcement may use.