Australia plans to use 3D printing technology to maintain submarine fleet

According tomedia reports, 3D printing will be used to repair the submarine additive manufacturing technology into the marine field. The technology was developed jointly by Australian-specific submarine maintenance organisationS ASC and CSIRO and DMTC Ltd to carry out in-place maintenance of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Collins-class submarines.

Australia plans to use 3D printing technology to maintain submarine fleet

For submarines, only a quarter of the submarines may be on mission, and the other three-quarters are either in transit, under repair or for training.

To get RAN out of this mess, ASC is seeking 3D printing technology as part of a two-year project to speed up submarine maintenance and maintenance. In particular, the company is developing a cold spray technology that can spray supersonic gases to accelerate the formation of dense deposits on the surface of metal powder particles.

Australia plans to use 3D printing technology to maintain submarine fleet

According to ASC, this method does not require the high temperature conditions required for other metal printing processes, nor does it damage other components in the adjacent area. The advantage is that when the submarine is floating at sea, the personnel involved can be repaired in situ without having to go into the dry dock, saving time and money. The company’s goal is to obtain technical licenses and eventually invest in the maintenance of the Navy’s Collins-class submarine fleet.

AsC chief executive Stuart Wiley said: “AsC is at the forefront of submarine maintenance innovation and it is vital to continue to improve the availability of Royal Australian Navy submarines. Using additive manufacturing technology to repair critical submarine components, including pressure-resistant hulls, will mean that our Collins-class frontline submarine fleet can carry out faster and less disruptive repairs. “

Australia plans to use 3D printing technology to maintain submarine fleet