Hamburg, Germany plans to replace Microsoft products with open source software

Moving from Microsoft commercial products to open source solutions can lead to the benefits of reducing licensing costs and better control over complete code. Few large institutions are willing to take the risk of migrating, driven by factors such as historical data and usage habits. But after Munich, another German city has expressed its desire to get rid of Microsoft, which has recently been actively embracing the open-source city of Hamburg.

Hamburg, Germany plans to replace Microsoft products with open source software

After Munich became a pioneer in the area, hamburg is also considering using open source software on local computers to reduce reliance on paid products, the report said, calling it a model of “digital sovereignty.”

A report by Der Standard notes that although the transition to open source is only a matter of time, the project is still in its early stages and the details are still known.

For example, whether the local government is considering a full shift to open source or a transition to the open source part with productivity suites such as LibreOffice.

If the former is the former, the Linux operating system is likely to replace the current Microsoft Windows Windows system.

It remains to be seen whether to take a ready-made distribution in the current Linux community or develop a derivative version of your own.

It is reported that the city of Munich has created its own LiMux project to facilitate the transition to open source software. Local governments are also using OpenOffice (and later LibreOffice) as an alternative to microsoft Office productivity suites.

Either way, for Linux and the open source ecosystem, the support of both cities will help drive the rapid growth of the open source space.

Hamburg, Germany plans to replace Microsoft products with open source software