The robotic arm assists NASA Insight’s Mole probe to successfully penetrate the interior of the Martian soil

The InSight probe, which is currently on a scientific mission to Mars, has successfully sent a number of high-value scientific expeditions to the ground, providing ample evidence for humans to land on the red planet in the future. But as the mission progressed, the thermal probe, codenamed Mole, was not popular with Mars and had been stuck in the soil for more than a year.

The robotic arm assists NASA Insight's Mole probe to successfully penetrate the interior of the Martian soil

The robotic arm assists NASA Insight's Mole probe to successfully penetrate the interior of the Martian soil

The robotic arm assists NASA Insight's Mole probe to successfully penetrate the interior of the Martian soil

The robotic arm assists NASA Insight's Mole probe to successfully penetrate the interior of the Martian soil

The robotic arm assists NASA Insight's Mole probe to successfully penetrate the interior of the Martian soil

Mole is known to be 16 inches long and is connected to the lander body by tether. The aim of the cutting-edge design is to be able to hammer it up to 16 feet in order to expand the measurement of heat. Unexpectedly, the Martian soil seemed to be harder than expected, causing considerable trouble for the mechanical Mole, which came from afar from Earth.

The robotic arm assists NASA Insight's Mole probe to successfully penetrate the interior of the Martian soil

After more than a year of unremitting efforts, NASA and the Mole engineering team finally solved the problem of the Mole getting stuck, and made some progress. NASA’s InSight official Twitter account tweeted: “After several assists from the robotic arm, the Mole managed to get underground. Troubleshooting millions of miles away is a challenge. We also need to see if the Mole can dig alone. “

The robotic arm assists NASA Insight's Mole probe to successfully penetrate the interior of the Martian soil