New spray process can be used to create more practical calcium-titanium solar photovoltaic panels

In some ways, synthetic calcium titanium compounds can be a better alternative to silicon semiconductors used in current photovoltaic panels. Although some obstacles still need to be overcome, a team of researchers at Mahilong University in Thailand has found new processes that could help to start widespread adoption. It is reported that one of the advantages of calcium titanium ore is to be more efficient than silicon semiconductors to absorb sunlight and convert energy, in addition to the new material is expected to further reduce the cost of photovoltaic panel manufacturing.

New spray process can be used to create more practical calcium-titanium solar photovoltaic panels

Spray process indication (from: Mahidol University)

The researchers point out that semiconductor materials need to be produced at very high temperatures and then cut into thin slices. In contrast, liquid calcium titanium can be simply sprayed onto glass and dried.

If different types of calcium-titanium ore can be added to continuous layers (optimized for different qualities), the efficiency of such solar photovoltaic panels is expected to be further enhanced. The problem now, however, is that new spray layers of liquid calcium titanium mines tend to dissolve the dry layers that apply them.

To solve this problem, scientists at Theuniversity in Mahilong, Thailand, have developed a new process called “spray sequential deposition”. This involves converting the liquid into very fine droplets before it is applied to the surface.

New spray process can be used to create more practical calcium-titanium solar photovoltaic panels

Research drawings (from: Optical Materials Express)

After making some adjustments to various parameters, including raising the application temperature to 100 degrees C / 212 degrees F, the researchers succeeded in applying high-stability calcium titanium ore to another dry layer with better electrical performance.

The resulting solar photovoltaic panel not only shows two clear defined layers, but also has both stability and good electrical performance. Chief scientist Dr. Pongsakorn Kanjanaboos said:

“Our work demonstrated a new spray process for layer-by-layer deposition of calcium titanium ore at a controlled thickness and deposition rate, resulting in higher performance and better stability in the stacking design of solar photovoltaic panels.”

Details of the study have been published in the recent lying optical materials express.

Originally published as Layer-by-layer spray coating of a stacked perovskite absorber for perovskite solar cells with better and stability under a environment humid.

New spray process can be used to create more practical calcium-titanium solar photovoltaic panels