Does Mars have a planetary ring? Hundreds of millions of years ago there might have been one

Mars may have had a Mars ring, according to a recent paper published at the American Astronomical Conference. Although evidence of the Mars ring may have ceased to exist, researchers believe Phobos and Deimos may have been the product of the planet’s rings around Mars.

Does Mars have a planetary ring? Hundreds of millions of years ago there might have been one

Does Mars have a planetary ring? Hundreds of millions of years ago there might have been one

Does Mars have a planetary ring? Hundreds of millions of years ago there might have been one

Does Mars have a planetary ring? Hundreds of millions of years ago there might have been one

Phobos, Fobos, is the larger of two Mars satellites, but it is also very small in size. It takes on an irregular shape with a contour size of about 26.6 km x 22.2 km x 18.6 km and looks like a potato.

Scientists believe that the formation of Phobos may have come from an asteroid impact on Mars. After the asteroid struck Mars, a large amount of debris spewed over its surface. The debris splashed into space, forming a ring-shaped structure that then gathered together to form a phonomy.

Deimos, a smaller satellite on Mars, has an average radius of 6.2 kilometers. The hypothesis of gravitational capture about its formation is relatively popular, but has been questioned. And its orbiting and the angle of Mars’ equator has never been properly explained, which is one of the reasons why new research attempts to analyze the Mars ring hypothesis.

Phobos II is gradually descending to the surface of Mars, closer to the surface of Mars. This happens very slowly, but in the end, it will be too close to remain intact, and the planet’s gravity and the moon’s speed in orbit will cause it to be torn to pieces.

Some of these debris may fall to the surface, but most of it may continue to orbit Mars, with large chunks of debris colliding with each other, creating dust and spreading outwards to form a real planetary ring. More interestingly, the ring could eventually become a satellite, which scientists say may have happened on Mars, where at different stages, it cycles between the satellite and the ring, and each time it becomes smaller.

Does Mars have a planetary ring? Hundreds of millions of years ago there might have been one

(Image caption A diagram of the process of the ring-satellite-ring experienced by The Fire Guard)

When all the debris from the Mars ring falls on the surface of Mars, the newly formed satellites begin to move closer to Mars, like Phobos, repeating the same mistakes they once did. It will then re-enter the Lothian limit, being torn apart by the gravity of Mars, and into a new round of satellite-ring-satellite cycles.

The video above is from the B station UP main swordsman star song

Does Mars have a planetary ring? Hundreds of millions of years ago there might have been one