Canada launches ‘double bubble’ strategy as it reopens to reduce spread of new coronavirus

Media BGR reported that all parts of Canada are gradually reopening, slowly loosening restrictions on social gatherings, and allowing families to form a “double bubble” that allows them to communicate and socialize freely. As long as families or groups of friends in each family do not branch out of the “shared bubble,” the risk of rapid spread of the new coronavirus is considered to be low. The technology has been tested by New Zealand and has been used in some European countries.

Canada launches 'double bubble' strategy as it reopens to reduce spread of new coronavirus

Some Canadian provinces are experimenting with what they call a “double bubble” model that gives citizens more breathing space and social interaction, while minimizing the risk of a second wave of new cases. The concept is simple. Instead of asking families to remain isolated, each family can choose a different family to interact with. These pairs must be exclusive, otherwise the experiment will not work. The idea of this experiment is that families of friends or relatives can form pairs, experience more social interaction, and ease the tension caused by some pandemics.

As long as members of these families have strict requirements for who they interact with and only interact with others in their own homes or at the homes of “double-bubble” partners, the risk of a rapid outbreak of the new coronavirus is still quite small.

The strategy was pioneered in New Zealand and tested in several European countries, Vox reported. It seems to be effective, and it’s a good strategy for countries that want to reduce restrictions but don’t want a second wave of new COVID-19 cases to overwhelm the health-care system.

Canada launches 'double bubble' strategy as it reopens to reduce spread of new coronavirus