New research suggests that the earth’s core may contain most of the earth’s water.

A new study published in Nature Nature suggests that the earth’s core may contain most of the Earth’s water, much more than the surface oceans. Recent studies suggest that Earth may have obtained large amounts of water from hydrogen-rich solar nebulae early in its evolution, and that much of that water may have entered the earth’s core.

There is considerable uncertainty about the budget and distribution of the Earth’s water, much of it due to a lack of information about the depths of the earth. The researchers tried to simulate what happened by analyzing the behavior of hydrogen at high pressure and high temperatures, similar to hydrogen found on the boundary between the mantle and the core.

    New research suggests that the earth's core may contain most of the earth's water.

     As disc-like matter that rotates around the sun forms the Earth, hydrogen enters the place that will become the earth’s core.

The researchers concluded that the geonuclear core may play the role of a large reservoir, containing most of the Earth’s water. More than three-quarters of the hydrogen from the early Earth scored on the Earth’s core. These findings partly explain the low density of the earth’s core, which is revealed by measuring the speed of an earthquake.                      

New research suggests that the earth's core may contain most of the earth's water.