Intel Announces Tenth Generation Core PL Power Consumption: 10 Core 5.3GHz 56 Seconds True Man

Intel officially launched the Tenth Generation Core desktop processor, the Core i-10000 series codenamed Comet Lake-S, at the end of April, and the flagship Core i9-10900K achieves a 10-core 20-thread, 5.3GHz acceleration frequency. How long can a frequency like 5.3GHz last, Intel has released data, 56 seconds real men’s duration is really not short.

AMD and Intel release the processor will announce TDP power consumption, this power consumption is actually thermal design power consumption, does not represent real power consumption, power consumption also depends on the PL (Power Limit) this indicator, it has can be divided into multiple levels, generally PL1 is equal to TDP power consumption, maintain the basic frequency of power consumption.

PL2 is the power consumption at the acceleration frequency, which can represent the power consumption at high frequencies of the CPU (although not yet the limit power consumption), and typically the PL2 consumes approximately 1.25 times the power consumption of the PL1.

On comet Lake-S processors, PL2 power consumption is no longer a fixed ratio, according to Intel’s latest document, the 10th generation Core processor’s PL2 power consumption is 20% higher than the PL1, more than 1-2 times, the TPU website organized specific specifications, as follows:

Intel Announces Tenth Generation Core PL Power Consumption: 10 Core 5.3GHz 56 Seconds True Man

Of these products, the most exaggerated of the PL2 power consumption ratio is the 35W low-power version of the Core i9/i7-10x00T series, the PL1 power consumption 35W, PL2 power consumption 123W, 3.5 times the former.

Then there are the 65W Core i9-10900 and Core i7-10700K processors, and the PL2 consumes 224W more than three times as much as the PL1 65.

The Core i9-10900K’s PL1 consumes 125W, but the PL2 consumes 250W, double the lift, and Tau lasts 56 seconds, meaning it can hold up to 56 seconds at 250W to allow the Core i9-10900K to operate at the acceleration frequency for a long time.

In addition, the Tau time of all three K-Series processors is 56 seconds, which is also the key to their high performance.

Intel Announces Tenth Generation Core PL Power Consumption: 10 Core 5.3GHz 56 Seconds True Man