New research suggests that the number of Earth-like planets in the Milky Way may be higher than we expected

For astronomers keen to find exoplanets, one of the important tasks is to find Earth-like planets. While existing techniques cannot be used to peer into the surface of distant planets to determine the existence of life, they can be judged comprehensively by assessing planetary composition or even the constituent elements of the atmosphere.

New research suggests that the number of Earth-like planets in the Milky Way may be higher than we expected

Picture from NASA

A recent study published in the Astrophysical Journal said that while we are trying to find Earth-like planets, the actual number may be higher than human expectations. The study suggests that stars like the sun may have more in the Milky Way than previously thought.

“When stars like our sun form systems around them, Earth-like planets are red-hot liquid magma forms that begin with them,” study co-author Dr. Richard Parker said in a statement. These magma-ocean planets near stars like the sun are more easily detectable and weigh twice as much as conventional stars. These planets emit so much heat that we will be able to observe their light using the next generation of infrared telescopes. “

“We’re going to find these planets, called the Young Moving Group, which are young stars younger than 100 million years old, ” says Dr Parker. But usually each surrounds contains dozens of stars, which are difficult to find because they have previously been incorporated into the background of the Milky Way. “

New research suggests that the number of Earth-like planets in the Milky Way may be higher than we expected