Facebook employee rage: Zuckerberg you don’t care about Trump I’m ashamed

Last week, hundreds of Facebook employees expressed unprecedented displeasure after Facebook decided not to take action on Trump’s incendiary blog post,media reported. Trump’s post also appeared on his Twitter page, referring to the ongoing protests against racism and police brutality in the United States, where he said, “The robbery begins, the shooting begins.” “

Facebook employee rage: Zuckerberg you don't care about Trump I'm ashamed

While Twitter labeled Trump’s tweets as “glorifying violence,” Facebook decided to do nothing. Facebook said Mr. Trump’s blog post discussed the use of state force and therefore did not violate the company’s policies. The decision was divisive within Facebook, with hundreds of employees protesting and several early employees writing an open letter asking the company to reverse the decision. In addition, at least two Facebook employees resigned earlier this week in protest.

Now,media reported that another Facebook employee, who posted a resignation letter in a group on Facebook’s internal app, had also decided to resign in protest. The resignation letter was addressed by Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, who made a key point in the letter: Facebook’s incocious interference with Trump’s inflammatory rhetoric is a way to hurt black communities inside and outside the company.

“I’m deeply ashamed to work for a company like this, because this highly racist and politician-inspired blog post went on Facebook. The resignation employee wrote that he was not black but belonged to people of color.

“Your own black employees ask you to respond meaningfully, but what about you?” Either self-defense or escape. You let all of us, the very few people of color in your company, be disappointed. Your refusal to speak out against violence against black people is chilling. “

While Zuckerberg said he strongly opposes Trump’s “shooting … Robbery” blog post, which he described as “disturbing” around the history of the language. But the CEO said at Tuesday’s plenary meeting that Mr. Trump’s tweets were not enough to be “interpreted as a crypto-speaker to civilian supporters (blowing a dog whistle and inciting them to defend justice with violence).” However, the former employee’s views are very different from Those of Mr Zuckerberg, especially since segregationists have used the phrase in its crackdown on black protesters since the civil rights era.

“We know that (Trump’s blog post) used the language of segregationists … Just because you don’t believe it’s a signal that violence is exacerbated (please tell us how you studied this?). Do you collect data on how this term is interpreted? ) Can you really look the black man in the eye and tell them they shouldn’t be understood like this? “

The employee said he had been contacted by several of his colleagues since the letter was posted last Thursday at an internal staff organization and said they were also considering resigning in protest.

The following is the full text of the resignation letter:

Hello, Mr. Zuckerberg.

I’m resigning to show you and Sheryl Sandberg’s protest, and your deep lack of compassion is shocking. You acknowledge that Trump’s racist blog posts not only incite further violence against blacks, but also violate Facebook’s community standards. I’m ashamed to work for a company like this because Facebook has bowed its head to a very racist blog post, just because it came from a politician. “

I feel that, as all those who can think critically today think, I live in a dystopian novel whose plot is getting darker and darker, page by page. What is the right choice (insinuating: issuing a clear warning or withdrawing a racist blog post) is obvious, but I have to stress that it is appalling.

I am here to quote your point of view through the leaked minutes of the meeting:

In fact, I think the video of the murder was posted on Facebook because our service gives people a voice, and that’s already had a huge impact. I just want to say that I hope people don’t just look at the moral impact of what we’re doing from a hurt-relief perspective. Of course, harm reduction is also an important part of what we have to do. I’m not ignoring that, we’re spending a lot of resources on this, thousands of people are working on that goal, and we’re spending billions of dollars on it every year.

But we also want to give people an unprecedented way to understand and discuss events so that painful voices can be heard. I think it’s also important, and I think that’s what I think about all these things.

Do we compare George Floyd’s Facebook video to Trump’s hate speech? Are we so sound-blind today that we don’t understand the difference between freedom of speech and racial prejudice? Isn’t “not hurting the real world” our standard? Does Trump really need a platform to express his racist views? You insist that this is “not” a signal to legitimize violence against blacks. I quote your following points for reference:

So we looked at the history of “daring to rob, dare to shoot”, and then we find that this is undoubtedly a disturbing historical rhetoric and quote, whether or not involving inciting supporters to commit acts of violence. Then, after reading all the content and communicating with different people, the quote clearly involved radical policing – and even excessive policing – but no past history could be interpreted as sending a swagon (“blowing a whistle” to civilian supporters) and inciting them to defend justice with violence.

We all know that it uses the language of apartheidists. Just because you don’t believe it’s a signal that violence is exacerbated (please tell us how you studied this?). Do you collect data on how this term is interpreted? ) Can you really look the black man in the eye and tell them they shouldn’t be understood like this? In such a crisis-ridden political environment, in an election year, violence against blacks has been so rampant that you really want to hide behind the claim that Facebook is still just a platform for communication? Hasn’t it tried to change the behaviour of two generations from the start?

Nothing, especially language, is forever neutral.

Black people all over America are frightened. Your own black employees ask you to respond meaningfully, but what about you? Either self-defense or escape. I broke down when I saw a black friend and colleague suffering from the long struggle of black people. What would you do if you had a chance to make a change (I mean real change – say it out loud – and not just spend money to solve it) would you do? There’s nothing. You let all of us, the very few people of color in your company, be disappointed. Your refusal to speak out against violence against black people is chilling.

I’m not as good at ignoring “the moral impact of what we do” as you are, so I chose to leave Facebook in protest. I can’t give my time and intelligence to a business where leaders are so timid.

Facebook employee rage: Zuckerberg you don't care about Trump I'm ashamed