European Space Agency: Global magnetic field intensity has fallen by 9% over the past 200 years

BEIJING, June 9 (Xinhua) — A long-standing weak area of intensity in the Earth’s magnetic field is becoming increasingly strange and may even split into two distinct anomalous regions. The South Atlantic Anomaly Zone is an area between Africa and South America with a magnetic field that covers southern And South Atlantic. For at least a few decades, the region’s magnetic field has become weaker and weaker, and this is part of a global trend. According to the European Space Agency (ESA), the global magnetic field strength has declined by 9% over the past 200 years. The North Atlantic anomaly seems to be a special point of change.

Now, satellite surveys of the anomalous region show that geomagnetic intensity is decreasing in southwestern Africa, suggesting that the anomalous region of the South Atlantic may split into two separate low-magnetic zones.

European Space Agency: Global magnetic field intensity has fallen by 9% over the past 200 years

The European Space Agency noted that this change does not imply any imminent danger, but may help to shed light on the geonuclear activities that drive these changes. Currently, the European Space Agency’s satellites are collecting data on electromagnetic fields in the hope of answering that question.

Changing areas

The compass and the normal work of the Global Positioning System (GPS) depend on the Earth’s magnetic field, which also protects the planet from charged solar particles and prevents them from damaging electrical equipment. Therefore, the fluctuations of the Earth’s magnetic field are important, but scientists know about it very little. The Earth’s magnetic field comes from the churning of the molten iron core, which is like a giant magnet (and therefore the North and South Poles). However, the geomagnetic field is not as uniform as a typical bar magnet, but has different strengths and weaknesses of the region, and sometimes even the north-south magnetic pole alternate.

At present, the weakening of the geomagnetic field may indicate another geomagnetic reversal, but it may also be a temporary fluctuation. The study found that if the geomagnetic field did reverse, i.e. the north and south poles were to be reconciled, the north Atlantic anomaly would probably be the origin of the change.

The Swarm satellite group, launched by the European Space Agency in 2013, is detecting this anomaly in search of small changes that could explain the state of the Earth’s nuclear system. According to the European Space Agency, since the satellite group entered orbit, the South Atlantic anomaly zone has formed a second weak magnetic intensity center. The emergence of this anomalous region indicates a complex process in the earth’s core, the agency said in a press release, saying that the use of dipoles alone and the magnetic fields of the south and north cannot explain this pattern.

Mysterious Core

“The weakest emerging and weakest values in the eastern part of the South Atlantic anomaly zone have emerged over the past decade and are developing rapidly in recent years,” said J?rgen Matzka, a geomagnetic researcher at the Helmholtz Potsdam Center-German Geosciences Center, in a statement. The challenge now is to understand the process that drives these changes in the earth’s core. “

According to the European Space Agency, the magnetic field in the region is very weak enough to affect satellites passing through the region. Without magnetic field protection, the International Space Station and other low-Earth orbit satellites are sometimes affected by space radiation, with “single accidents” such as communication disruptions or computer failures. Astronauts sometimes see white light in front of them.

In 2018, former astronaut Terry Virts told the BBC: “This is a well-known region where all the different types of satellites – not just manned space stations, but ordinary communications satellites and other satellites – will have problems. You’ll want to get there as fast as you can, whether it’s going to the moon, or going to the moon or anywhere you want to go. (Any day)

European Space Agency: Global magnetic field intensity has fallen by 9% over the past 200 years