CDC says some Americans use bleach to gargle to prevent new coronavirus infection

According to a new study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 39 percent of respondents said they had at least once used bleach chemicals to prevent new coronavirus infections at high risk, including drinking soapy water or diluted bleach solutions or gargling with them, according to a new study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The researchers conducted a survey of 502 Americans in May asking about household cleaning and disinfection practices.

The CDC said the study was conducted because “a recent report describes a sharp increase in calls to poison centers associated with exposure to detergents and disinfectants since the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic” and that data is limited. The results are disturbing because the CDC has found that various cases of chemical use that can lead to unnecessary side effects are misused, all efforts to prevent infection.

CDC says some Americans use bleach to gargle to prevent new coronavirus infection

Some respondents said they had washed fruits and vegetables with bleach and sprayed with disinfectant sprays. They also said they had inhaled steam from detergents or disinfectants, or had drunk soapy water, diluted bleach solutions and other disinfectant solutions to gargle.

Thirty-nine percent said they had deliberately engaged in at least one high-risk behavior not recommended by the CDC to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission, including the use of bleach to apply food (e.g. fruits and vegetables) (19%) to household cleaning and disinfection products (18%) on hands or skin, to spray the body with cleaning or disinfectant (10%) ( 10%) , and to drink or rinse bleach ingresss steam (6%) and drinking or dilution of bleached solutions, soaps and other disinfectants (4%)

The report also noted that 25 percent of respondents reported that in the past month, they believed that at least one adverse health effect was due to exposure to the chemicals.

A quarter (25 per cent) of respondents reported that they believed that at least one adverse health effect last month was due to the use of detergents or disinfectants, including nose or sinus irritation (11 per cent); Respondents who claimed to have engaged in at least one high-risk behavior reported adverse health effects more often than those who had not reported it (39 percent vs. 16 percent).

In light of these findings, the CDC said there is a need for a public message “on safe and effective cleaning and disinfection practices designed to prevent the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the home.”

“COVID-19 prevention information should continue to emphasize evidence-based safety practices, such as regular hand hygiene and frequent cleaning and disinfection of high-touch surfaces,” the CDC wrote. While the study also shows that people know how to use and store some of the target chemicals safely, there is room for improvement. “

CDC says some Americans use bleach to gargle to prevent new coronavirus infection