10 years old: NASA confirms James Webb space telescope won’t launch in March next year, continues to delay

Astronomers are looking forward to the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to jump again. Nasa’s head of science, Thomas Zurbuchen, said Wednesday that the James Webb Space Telescope will not be launched as scheduled in March next year. He also stressed that it was not anyone’s fault or management error. Currently, contractor Northrop Grumman is integrating NASA’s assessment of the new time, which will end in July, and Zurbuchen stressed that he remains confident that the telescope will leave the launch pad in 2021.

According to the signals released by Zurbuchen, the main reason for the project jump was that the outbreak had disrupted the work of many NASA employees and prevented the original mission from going ahead.

In fact, the James Webb project, the successor to the Hubble telescope, has been going on for more than 20 years, with the earliest launch plans dating back 10 years.

In addition, the initial budget of $1 billion has added the cost to $9.7 billion, which may not be enough.

It is reported that the James Webb Space Telescope will be launched from ESA’s Kourou base in French Guiana aboard the Ariane 5 carrier rocket.

10 years old: NASA confirms James Webb space telescope won't launch in March next year, continues to delay