Newton had proposed a secret cure for the Black Death: “The vomit sugar”

Isaac Newton, a famous scientist who has proposed a cure for the Black Death, “the stoic sugar”, details how to treat the Black Death with vomit, in addition to recommending the gem amulets for the prevention of the Black Death, and a two-page unpublished manuscript written by Newton himself is being auctioned.

Newton detailed in the recipe how to hang the legs upside down in the chimney for three days, causing it to vomit out of a mud-like substance mixed with multiple insects, but the vomit must be placed on a plate of yellow wax. When the dragonfly dies, the carcass is dried into a powder and mixed with vomit and serum to make a special tablet applied to the infected site. Newton points out that this treatment can drive away infectious diseases and expel toxins from the body. Thetherapy is very good, but if you are in a critical situation, you can also use amulets made of wind letter, sapphire or amber as an antidote.

Newton and the researchers of the time did not know that vomit or gem amulets did not work to cure the Black Death, and it was not until 1894 that French and Swiss scientist Alexandre Yersin knew that the Black Death was caused by a bacterium, which was later named “Yersina versus plague” in his memory.

Today, people use antibiotics to treat plague, rather than to use inverted slugs to produce “vomit sugar”. Newton may have written the notes about the plague shortly after returning to Cambridge University in 1667, according to the auction house that auctioned the manuscript. At that time, the plague was sweeping across Europe, forcing the temporary closure of cambridge university in 1665. During this time, Newton was isolated in a small village in Lincolnshire, England, where he used the time to study the laws of gravity and motion. 1666 was called Newton’s “Year of Miracles”.

Newton detailed in the recipe how to hang the legs upside down in the chimney for three days, causing it to vomit out of a mud-like substance mixed with multiple insects, but the vomit must be placed on a plate of yellow wax

Although the erudite Newton made a splash of gravity, his work on the causes, symptoms and treatments of plague was not world-renowned. In fact, the manuscripts are not entirely his own research, and Newton has been reading The Plague Grave, written by Jan Baptist Van Helmont, a Hispanic Dutch chemist and physiologist.

Newton’s manuscript notes were not verbatim, but a treatment summed up through Newton’s detailed observations, the auction house said. Not all of Hermont’s research has been rejected by future generations, for example, according to the Philadelphia Institute of Science and History, which led him to co-invent the term “gas” by discovering that chemical reactions can produce substances that are neither solid nor liquid. But some religious zealots use some unusual treatments.

In 1936, Newton’s manuscript of the Plague was auctioned along with a number of other works at Sotheby’s Portsmouth auction. According to the auction house, the two-page manuscript, which was lost for more than 70 years, was not discovered until recently and is now on the market for $65,000.