Mars Holden Crater has delicate layered sandstone

Beijing time, June 12, according tomedia reports, Mars Holden Crater’s stratospheric sandstone is reminiscent of the red rock terrain of the southwestern United States. This image, taken by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) on-board High-Resolution Scientific Experimental Imaging Camera (HiRISE), shows a swirling sandstone in the Holden Crater, 140 km in diameter.

Mars Holden Crater has delicate layered sandstone

  This image, taken by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) on-board High-Resolution Scientific Experimental Imaging Camera (HiRISE), shows a swirling sandstone in the Holden Crater, 140 km in diameter.

On June 8, NASA officials described the photo as large parts of Mars covered in dust, but piles of sediments could be seen in some areas. In this photo, the sand layers south of the Holden Crater present a refined layer of layers that provide important clues to the complex geological history of Mars.

This history includes ancient Martian surfaces that may have supported the survival of Earth-like life, and survey data from rovers such as the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and the Curiosity Rover suggest that there were rivers and lakes on Mars in ancient times. Some scientists even believe that much of Mars in the northern hemisphere was an ocean in ancient times.

About 4 billion years ago, everything changed, Mars lost its global magnetic field, Mars’s once dense atmosphere was stripped away by charged particles from the solar wind, and Mars gradually became today’s cold, dry red planet.

By the way, Holden Crater was once one of curiosity’s marsleta candidate landing sites, but NASA eventually chose the 154-kilometer-diameter Gale Crater.

Holden Crater is about 26 degrees south of Mars’ equator, while Gale Crater is only about 5 degrees south of mars’s equator. (Leaf Town)