Hackers fake SpaceX channel scam swindle with $1.5 million worth of bitcoins in two days

Hackers pretend to be Musk’s YouTube account to “dig!” According tomedia reports, hackers hijacked three YouTube channels, posing as Elon Musk’s SpaceX channel for Bitcoin scams. So far, these scams have defrauded nearly $150,000 in bitcoins in two days. The three channels are: Juice TV, Right Human, Maxim Sakulevich. After being hijacked by hackers, their names become SpaceX Live or SpaceX. One channel has 230,000 subscribers and the other has 131,000.

In addition, the channel, which was hijacked by hackers, is now a live video of Musk’s interviews or spaceX meetings, and promotes scams that require people to send small amounts of bitcoins in return for double returns, the report said.

Hackers fake SpaceX channel scam swindle with $1.5 million worth of bitcoins in two days

The truth is extremely high.

Since June 8, the two channels have been watched by tens of thousands of people, and in the process of watching the live stream, they will ask users to send bitcoins to the address, just two days after the hackers have harvested $1.5 million in bitcoins.

The two Bitcoin addresses are as follows:

1 lonmusk 14 jsgnyacpjnqububyzpyjcj

The company has received 29 Bitcoin transactions for a total of 4.08 BTC. At current prices, this amount is equivalent to $39,840.18.

Hackers fake SpaceX channel scam swindle with $1.5 million worth of bitcoins in two days

3 etrspkmrgwee 9ondmwcafqah 9 jj 9rm

The address has received 84 transactions for a total value of 11.23 BTC, valued at $109658.14.

Hackers fake SpaceX channel scam swindle with $1.5 million worth of bitcoins in two days

So far, YouTube has not responded.

Specially pick celebrity hands

It’s not the first time Musk has been targeted by hackers, who faked Musk’s Twitter account in 2018 for bitcoin scams worth nearly $170,000, or 1.2 million yuan.

There was an e-mail at the time:

Hackers fake SpaceX channel scam swindle with $1.5 million worth of bitcoins in two days

Don’t be too real!

But it’s not just Musk who, according tomedia, has been hijacked after the official Twitter account of US retail giant Target was hijacked, with hackers sending a fraudulent link to its nearly 2 million followers saying users would have a chance to win 5,000 bitcoins by sending them a cryptocurrency.

Hackers fake SpaceX channel scam swindle with $1.5 million worth of bitcoins in two days

Similarly, hackers have stolen Google’s official G Suite account on Twitter, telling more than 800,000 fans that they will launch the world’s most lucrative cryptocurrency giveaway campaign, giving fans 10,000 bitcoins, provided that fans first give their address to 0.1 to 2 bitcoins to verify the address, and claim that the more you turn, the higher the reward.

Hackers fake SpaceX channel scam swindle with $1.5 million worth of bitcoins in two days

Even Trump can’t escape the hackers’ control.

Fortune previously reported that hackers hacked into the Twitter account “JoyJoyce2” and changed its name to a very similar name to Trump’s Twitter account, then posted a cryptocurrency scam tweet that targeted Twitter users who followed President Trump.

As fans read Trump’s tweets, black accounts responded by saying that Trump was offering 5,000 E-dollars and 500 bitcoins as a giveaway, followed by a link. But in fact these tweets are fake, accounts run by bots, and links are malicious websites that steal fan information.

Why are hackers eyeing the business of blackmailing Bitcoin?

You might like to ask, for hackers, there are many ways to get money, why pretend to be accounts to ask for Bitcoin to make money? The answer, of course, is that mining can get rich ah, and simple and fast, and other ways, mining is the shortcut to become a billionaire ah.

Lei Feng asked a blockchain reporter who, according to her, if a person holds 0.28 bitcoins, you are statistically at least the richest 1% of the bitcoin world.

So the distance between ordinary life and billionaires, the original is a bitcoin.

In addition to being able to make money quickly and easily, another reason hackers are targeting the Bitcoin business is the market demand behind it.

Media reported that in hacking and cybercrime forums, more and more people are willing to buy stolen YouTube certificates, where access to accounts is sold in large numbers.

Surprisingly, the hackers also inadvertently helped the data verification service company get into business. Researchers at IntSights External Threat Intelligence found that as the underground market demand for YouTube certification increased, it also contributed to the data validation business.

For a chestnut, bidding for a channel with 200,000 users starts at $1,000 and the median price is $200.

For example, the Hacking Forum auctioned logs from 990,000 active YouTube channels, starting at $1,500, and 687 YouTube accounts, broken down by number of users, starting at $400.

Hackers fake SpaceX channel scam swindle with $1.5 million worth of bitcoins in two days

This is simply a lucrative business ah, but still want to remind everyone, buy and sell accounts this kind of thing is not desirable Oh!

What if my account is stolen?

In general, hackers are scammed by selling cryptocurrency giveaway scams or directly asking fans to send them digital currencies, or changing account names to celebrity signs.

So, if your account is stolen, is there any way to get it back?

A big probability is impossible unless you hand in the currency. According to one user whose account was stolen, complained on Twitter:

They pretend to be sponsors of youtube and when I try to access their website, a keylogger/spyware is downloaded to my browser. They changed my password, deleted my known device, deleted my recovery phone number and email, for up to 2 minutes. Then they tried to blackmail me into sending them btc or they would sell my channel.

Therefore, do not point to unknown websites, improve security awareness is the best way to protect their accounts from theft.

The next thing you say, I’m sure you’ve heard it countless times, but it’s still worth repeating:

Don’t point the links you shouldn’t, don’t point in unidentified mail.

Otherwise, if you’re not careful, you’ll become a hacker’s “lamb” to be slaughtered.