New research suggests that the ability of the new coronavirus to reach out to the virus is equally important.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says the new coronavirus is unlikely to spread through the surface of an object, and droplets remain the main route of transmission, so measures such as wearing masks and maintaining social dissociation are still necessary. But a new study by University College London has sampled viral DNA from tests placed on the armrests of hospital isolation rooms. It was found that in 10 hours, viral DNA could spread across 41% of the ward sample area.

New research suggests that the ability of the new coronavirus to reach out to the virus is equally important.

(From: University College London / Journal of Hospitality)

This study shows how easy it is for pathogens to move between surfaces of objects, thus emphasizing the importance of personal hygiene and protective equipment during the New Crown virus pandemic.

After all, when the carrier of the virus is speaking, it is likely to bring out smaller droplets. If you cough or sneeze, the droplets will be bigger and larger.

The virus can then spread across various surfaces, which is a major reason health agencies are calling for frequent hand washing and avoiding touching public objects.

New research suggests that the ability of the new coronavirus to reach out to the virus is equally important.

44 places are sampled daily, with a percentage of positive tests in overall/different regions.

Although the risk of exposure to transmission is not as high as that of droplets, the risk remains. If you touch your eyes, nose and mouth after accidentally touching the surface of an object with the virus, there is still a possibility of being infected with the virus.

Previous studies have shown that the virus can survive for hours or days in the air and on specific surfaces. Now the new study suggests that viral DNA can be widely spread in hospital wards.

Comprehensive sampling within 10 hours showed that almost half of the viral DNA remained in a hospital bed, or even for five days. Fortunately, the virus chosen for the study is not a live strain of the new coronavirus.

New research suggests that the ability of the new coronavirus to reach out to the virus is equally important.

CDC’s guidelines for May 11

It is reported that the team copied a portion of the DNA fragment from a plant infection virus that does not infect humans and immersed it in a solution at a concentration of 0.1 ml, the same as the SAV-CoV-2 concentration.

Viral DNA has been spread across doorhandles, waiting room deputies and even toys and books in children’s play areas, after 10 years of smearing “tested objects” on bed bars in isolation rooms. The researchers detected viral DNA in 41 percent of the sample area, then reached 52 percent within three days, and dropped to 41 percent on the fifth day.

In addition to emphasizing good personal hygiene practices, study senior author Dr Lena Ciric said: “One of the samples is frequently exposed to staff, patients and visitors at one location, but new coronavirus infections can also spread the virus to more places by coughing, sneezing, touching the surface, and so on.”