Scientists discover 133,000-year-old Chinese bird statue

According to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE, a team of researchers from China, Canada and other researchers reported a 13,300-year-old miniature bird statue unearthed at the Xuchang site in Lingjing, Henan province. This is the oldest Chinese sculpture, and its discovery brings the performance of birds in Chinese art more than 8,000 years ahead of schedule.

The bird statue is 19.2 mm long, 5.1 mm wide, 12.5 mm high, black-brown on one side and bronzeony on the other, with a stout, short head, round beak and long tail, and is likely to be a bird.” Using a microscope and microtomography analysis, the researchers found that the statue was carved from a medium-sized fragment of the bone of a mammalian limb, which they concluded had been heated and carefully carved. The artists at the time used techniques such as grinding, cutting, scraping and cutting, leaving 68 tiny faces on the surface of the object.

The oldest statue is currently found at the ancient Orinasia site of Swabianjura, Germany, dating back 40,000 years. However, for most of the world, it is not clear when three-dimensional manifestations become part of the culture of human society as a whole, and the origin of this innovation. The bird statue is technically and stylistically different from other specimens found in Western Europe and Siberia, such as the use of a rectangular pedestal instead of the bird’s leg to stand.

Scientists discover 133,000-year-old Chinese bird statue