New infrared images of Phobos reveal help astronomers better understand Mars

Beijing time on June 17, according tomedia reports, at present, the latest thermal imaging images make Phoebe present a variety of colors, like a “cosmic candy.” NASA’s Odyssey Mars rover, which has been orbiting Mars since 2001, uses infrared cameras to measure temperature changes in three different lighting stages.

New infrared images of Phobos reveal help astronomers better understand Mars

  A more complete image of the phobos surface could help astronomers better understand the evolution of Mars, Phobos and Phobos (13 km in diameter). Some scientists believe the two satellites are asteroids captured by the gravity of Mars, but others suspect they are satellites synthesized after the powerful object collides with Mars.

In full sunlight, images taken on 9 December 2019 show a maximum temperature of 27 degrees Celsius, and the second photo was taken on February 25 this year, when the recordtemperature was as low as minus 123 degrees Celsius. The Mars Odyssey team said it was the lowest temperature on record.

The third photo was taken on March 27, when Phobos had just left the shadow of Mars and observed its temperature between the first two. On June 9, NASA officials released the thermal images in an attempt to gather more information about Phobos.

‘We have observed a relatively uniform surface of Phobos, which is made up of very fine material,’ Christopher Edwards of the University of Northern Arizona, who handled and analyzed the phobos image, said in a statement.

“These observations will help to characterize the composition of Phobos, and future observations will provide a more complete picture of extreme temperatures on the lunar surface,” he said. “

A more complete image of the phobos surface could help astronomers better understand the evolution of Mars, Phobos and Phobos (13 km in diameter). Some scientists believe the two satellites are asteroids captured by the gravity of Mars, but others suspect they are satellites synthesized after the powerful object collides with Mars.

The infrared camera of the Odyssey Mars rover is known as the Thermal Release Imaging System (THEMIS), and the newly released infrared image does not look like it was before Phobos. NASA officials say all OF THEMIS infrared images are colored to allow for temperature changes and overlap with THEMIS visible light images to show surface geology. The only special one is the computer system-generated total eclipse image, which shows what it looks like if Phobos are not completely in the shadows.

The Odyssey Mars rover, which focuses on the surface of Mars, has also been studying the surface of The Phobos in recent years. Although the probe is in good condition, it is unclear how long it will last, including relay communication between the Earth Mission Control Center and the Mars Surface Robot. (Leaf Town)