New study says nearly 10 percent of new coronary patients don’t produce antibodies after initial infection recovers

As the number of newly confirmed and fatal deaths in the United States continues to rise, scientists and researchers continue to delve into the virus in depth to develop effective vaccines and therapeutic drugs. The new study gives researchers a deeper understanding of one of the key information they need about the virus — who can develop protective antibodies to fight the virus. According to a new study by St George’s College, University of London, less than 10 per cent of those who successfully beat the new coronavirus did not produce the protective antibodies needed to fight a second infection.

New study says nearly 10 percent of new coronary patients don't produce antibodies after initial infection recovers

The study involved 177 patients with neo-coronary pneumonia, and within weeks of their battle with the virus, scientists specialized in the protein sins of their bodies. Scientists at St George’s College, University of London, found that 8.5 per cent of people recovered from their initial infection without developing antibodies that would protect them from re-infection with the new coronavirus.

Earlier studies and statistics showed that minorities in the United States were more likely than white patients to suffer from severe new coronary virus infections, while studies at St. George’s College, University of London, showed higher levels of antibodies among non-white patients. But more importantly, the results are only preliminary — meaning they have not been peer-reviewed by other scholars.

New study says nearly 10 percent of new coronary patients don't produce antibodies after initial infection recovers

However, the study appears to be in line with the work of Theon, a Chinese pharmaceutical company, which just released the COVID-19 vaccine study, which showed that about 90 percent of volunteers produced antibodies in a promising trial of the new coronavirus vaccine. Nearly 10 per cent of the volunteers in the St George’s College London study did not produce antibodies.