Nanosponges block SARS-CoV-2 infection

Nanoparticles that envetose human lung cell membranes and human immune cell membranes attract and disable the SARS-CoV-2 virus in cell culture, losing the ability to hijack host cells and reproduce. The new study, published in the journal Nano Letter, describes a new direction against the COVID-19 coronavirus. The nanosponge was developed by engineers in San Diego, California, and tested by researchers at Boston University.

Nanosponges block SARS-CoV-2 infection

The researchers say the nanoparticles are “nanosponges” because they absorb harmful pathogens and toxins. In the experiment, both lung cells and nanosponges of immune cell types lost nearly 90 percent of the virus’s “viral infections.” This nanosponge is not designed to target viruses, but protects healthy cells from viruses.