Scientists searching for dark matter find a potential physics mystery

Researchers at Italy’s National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) At the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) used the XENON1T detector to search for dark matter,media reported. The “accidents” that these scientists looking for dark matter inadvertently recorded may have led them to rethink modern physics. Researchers on the XENON1T probe team aren’t entirely sure what they found — they didn’t claim to be dark matter — but it could be just as exciting.

Scientists searching for dark matter find a potential physics mystery

XENON1T is designed to observe the presence of tiny particles, filled with 3.2 tons of liquid argon, which acts as a giant target for solar axis, using neutrinos to enhance neutrino magnetic moments and boson dark matter. When one of the particles passes through the target, it can trigger free electrons of light and thorium atoms.

Although XENON1T has been used to look for dark matter from weakly interacting heavy particles (WIMPs), it is also sensitive to other new particles and interactions. The scientists estimated the number of background events, but compared them with actual data from the instrument and found 53 more than the 232 events expected.

Where exactly did this extra stake come from is the subject of a new paper that is currently being pre-printed. “The excess Rhe feature is similar to the result of tiny residual radon, a hydrogen atom with one proton and two neutrons,” the researchers suggest, “but it could also be a sign of something more exciting — such as the presence of a new particle called a sunaxis, or a previously unknown characteristic of neutrinos.” “

Scientists searching for dark matter find a potential physics mystery

Part of the challenge for researchers is that methods of finally confirming or negating possible theories are not always known. For example, if it is a trace amount of radon, only a few atoms are needed to explain the strange results. However, there is no independent measurement method to confirm or refute its existence at such a small level. In addition, excess events may also come from new particles. It has been pointed out that the observed energy spectrum is in fact similar to the axial axis produced in the sun.

“Axis is an imaginary particle that is proposed to preserve the time-reversal symmetry of the nuclear forces, and the sun may be a powerful source of them,” explains the XENON researchers. “Although these solar axes are not candidates for dark matter, their detection will mark the first observation of a new class of well-motivated but unobserved particles that have had a significant impact on our understanding of basic physics and on astrophysical phenomena. “

Scientists searching for dark matter find a potential physics mystery

Although not dark matter itself, this axis may be a precursor. One theory is that axiomes from the early universe may actually be the source of dark matter, which researchers believe accounts for a large proportion of matter. Researchers don’t think neutrinos may also be “the culprits.” If so, however, it is possible that the magnetic moment of neutrinos is actually larger than the current standard model of elementary particles suggests. “It would be a strong indication that some other new physics is needed to explain it, ” the team said.

Although XENON researchers prefer the solar axis theory, it is not clear which theory is correct. However, this mystery may be solved in the next phase of research, and XENON1T will be upgraded to XENONNT: the active radon mass is three times that of its predecessor. “With better data from XENONnT,” the researchers suggest, “the XENON collaboration is confident that this excess data will soon find out whether this excess data is a mere statistical fluke, a background pollutant, or something more exciting: a new particle or interaction that transcends known physics.”