Microsoft continues to improve browser page scrolling experience on Windows 10

Microsoft continues to develop on the open source Chromium platform, and recently implemented an improvement to improve Google Chrome’s smooth scrolling on the Windows 10 operating system and fix the extremely slow scrolling experience on some websites. Microsoft is understood to be working to introduce percentage-based scrolling features into the Chromium browser.

Microsoft continues to improve browser page scrolling experience on Windows 10

Current Chrome kernel-based browsers, including Google Chrome, are still using fixed scroll ingress, which can obviously lead to inconsistent scrolling experiences.

Earlier this year, Microsoft confirmed that it was using percentage-based rolling increments. By introducing this improvement, the software giant is expected to calculate the number better, making it easier for smaller scroll bars.

In a community post that has been submitted (marked as active) to the Chromium open source project, Microsoft notes that the small scroll bar is also less enhanced, causing the scrolling experience to become very slow.

It can be set to a minimum of 15 pixels, which is also a common value for the default font size for many browsers and can handle scrolling matches of text content in most cases.

But by limiting the large scroll bar to 12.5% of the viewwindow, Microsoft has allowed the root scroller to increase as expected.

Microsoft continues to improve browser page scrolling experience on Windows 10

Percentage-based scrolling increments have faster response times and are more useful for busy sites. In fact, it’s part of the effort to bring Edge-style scrolling experiences, back-feeding, and enhanced Chromium open source projects.

The submission was marked as active on June 18 and is expected to be rolled out to Google Chrome soon (as usual, the Chrome Canary development branch will open the fresh experience).

Another improvement that Chromium is about to usher in is the “Roll to top auto-bounce” (also known as the rubber band effect). The more noticeable this animation is when the user scrolls in any direction to the end of the page.

While this feature is still being tested, both Chrome Canary and Microsoft Edge Stables are available.